Course Catalog | Department of English

Course Catalog

ENG447
Literary Culture .............
4.00
Undergraduate
Course Summary This course seeks to familiarize students with the characteristic impulses that went into the literary culture associated with the European Enlightenment and Romanticism. Beginning with excerpts from Voltaire and Rousseau , we will move to themes such as women and the Enlightenment , reason and liberty, conservative literary culture in the age of reason, Romanticism and the limits of Enlightenment reason, Romantic poetry and the French Revolution, Romanticism and nature, Romanticism and the imagination. Course Aims 1. To familiarize students with the characteristic impulses that went into the literary culture associated with the European Enlightenment and Romanticism. 2. To familiarize the student with some major intellectual currents of the Enlightenment and Romanticism. 3. To familiarize the student with some landmark literary texts (in prose as well as poetry) of the Enlightenment and Romanticism. Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the course, students will be able to: a) Have a strong understanding of the dialectical interplay between the literary cultures of the Enlightenment and that of Romanticism b) Be conversant with some of major works of prose and poetry from the ages of the Enlightenment and Romanticism. Curriculum Content Syllabus Unit 1 Voltaire , Treatise on Tolerance ( excerpts) Rousseau , Discourse on Inequality ( excerpts) Mary Wollstonecraft, Vindication of the Rights of Women (excerpts) Unit 2 Jonathan Swift, A Modest Proposal Alexander Pope , Dunciad Book 1. Unit 3 Mary Shelly, Frankenstein Unit 4. William Blake, “London” P B Shelley “Ode to the West Wind” Samuel Taylor Coleridge , “Kubla Khan” William Wordsworth , “Intimations of Immortality” John Keats, “Ode to Autumn” Ann Finch, “ A Nocturnal ReverieGeetanjali Shree, Mai Michael Ondaantje, “The Passions of Lalla”, Running in the Family. Weekly Schedule: Week 1 Unit 1: Intellectual background Week 2 Unit 1: Intellectual background Week 3 Unit 1: Intellectual background Week 4 Unit 2: literary texts from the Enlightenment Week 5 Unit 2: literary texts from the Enlightenment Week 6 Unit 2: literary texts from the Enlightenment Week 7 Unit 2: literary texts from the Enlightenment Week 8 Unit 3: Gothic Novel Week 9 Unit 3: Gothic Novel Week 10 Unit 3: Gothic Novel Week 11 Unit 4: Romantic Poetry Week 12 Unit 4: Romantic Poetry Week 13 Unit 4: Romantic Poetry Week 14 Unit 4: Romantic Poetry Teaching and Learning Strategy a) Lectures Students will come prepared with the readings prescribed for the class discussion. b) Tutorials will be used by students to clarify questions and to discuss any material related to the course. c) Blackboard will be used to share e-books and other class material, and to enable online discussions. Teaching and Learning Strategy Class Hours Out-of-Class Hours Lectures 40 hours 80 hours Tutorials 14 hours   PART C: ASSESSMENT. Assessment Strategy Formative Assessment: a) Test 1 b) Mid-sem c) Assignment d) Final Exam Mapping of Learning Outcomes to Assessment Strategy Assessment Scheme Type of Assessment Description Percentage Test on Unit 1 15 Mid sem on Unit 2 30 Assignment on Unit 3 20 End sem on Unit 4 35 Total 100 Bibliography References: Ania Loomba, Colonialism/postcolonialism, Oxon, NY: Routledge, 1998. Kwame Anthony Appiah, “Is the Post in Postmodernism the Post- in Postcolonial?”, Critical Inquiry 17, no. 2 (1991): 336-57. Aamir R. Mufti, “Orientalism and the Institution of Indian Literature”, Forget English! Orientalisms and World Literatures, Harvard University Press, 2016. [More books and essays will be suggested as we cover the primary texts.]
ENG328
Creative Writing
4.00
Undergraduate
Course description not available.
ENG347
Popular Fiction
4.00
Undergraduate
Course Summary: This course shall introduce debates around popular fiction as well as some readings from popular fiction from Britain and South Asia in the 20th century. The course will unpack theoretical categories such as “popular”, “culture” and “taste” fundamental to engaging with the texts as well as undertake a close reading of fiction (novels, graphic novels and short stories) from Britain and South Asia focusing on genres like crime and detective fiction, romance, children’s literature and the graphic novel. Course Aims At the end of the course, students should be able to be familiar with the debates of the “popular”, “culture” and “taste” as well as a survey of some representative texts from Britain and India. Learning Outcomes Focusing on language, discourse, genres and social orientation of the popular, this course will equip students with sophisticated conceptual frames to deal with a category of literature that has often been widely disparaged. Curriculum Content Syllabus Unit 1: Raymond Williams, “The Analysis of Culture”, Cultural Theory and Popular Culture: A reader, ed. John Storey. Georgia: Uni. Of Georgia Press, 1998. Pierre Bourdieu, “The Aesthetic Sense as a Sense of Distinction”, Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgment of Taste. London: Routledge, 1979. Unit 2: Britain - Penny Dreadful and Golden Age Detective Fiction The Poor Boys of London, Penny dreadful, 1866. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, Agatha Christie, 1926. Unit 3: India - Stretching the Generic Boundaries Haroun and the Sea of Stories, Salman Rushdie, 1990. Bhimayana, Subhash Vyam, S. Anand, Srividya Natarajan, Durga Bai, 2011. Unit 4: Reading the Romance in Hinglish The Zoya Factor, Anuja Chauhan, 2008. Teaching and Learning Strategy a) Lectures will be modelled more on lecture style rather than interactive style. b) Tutorials will be used for more free based interactions with students about particular issues that arise in the lectures. c) Blackboard will be used to share e-books and other class material, and to enable online discussions. Teaching and Learning Strategy Class Hours Out-of-Class Hours Lectures 40 hours 80 hours Presentations 5 hours 10 hours Tutorials 15 hours PART C: ASSSESSMENT. Assessment Strategy Formative Assessment: a) Response Paper b) Mid Term Test c) Final Assignment Mapping of Learning Outcomes to Assessment Strategy Assessment Scheme Type of Assessment Description Percentage Response Paper First response to the first unit on cultural and popular theory. 20% Mid Term Test Test on Britain - Penny Dreadful and Golden Age Detective Fiction 40% Final Assignment Critical Analysis and Application of any of the texts taught in units 3 and 4 (India) 40% Total 100% Bibliography 1. Raymond Williams, “The Analysis of Culture”, Cultural Theory and Popular Culture: A reader, ed. John Storey. Georgia: Uni. Of Georgia Press, 1998. 2. Pierre Bourdieu, “The Aesthetic Sense as a Sense of Distinction”, Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgment of Taste. London: Routledge, 1979. 3. The Poor Boys of London, Penny dreadful, 1866. 4. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, Agatha Christie, 1926. 5. Haroun and the Sea of Stories, Salman Rushdie, 1990. 6. Bhimayana, Subhash Vyam, S. Anand, Srividya Natarajan, Durga Bai, 2011. 7. The Zoya Factor, Anuja Chauhan, 2008.
ENG346
Introduction to Postcoloniality
4.00
Undergraduate
This course shall introduce postcolonial theory and literature from South America, South Asia and Africa. The course will alert the students to larger questions and debates around the term “postcolonial” and how it has had varied (and often contested) meanings and progressions as an academic discipline as well more recently in the larger context of globalisation and cultural imperialism. It will also focus on a close reading of fiction (novels and short stories) as well as memoir writing from South America, South Asia and Africa. Primary Texts Gabriel Garcia Marquez, “The Incredible and Sad Tale of Innocent Erendira and Her Heartless Grandmother” Alejandro Zambra, “Memories of my Personal Computer” Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, “The Arrangers of Marriage” Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart. Geetanjali Shree, Mai Michael Ondaantje, “The Passions of Lalla”, Running in the Family. References: Ania Loomba, Colonialism/postcolonialism, Oxon, NY: Routledge, 1998. Kwame Anthony Appiah, “Is the Post in Postmodernism the Post- in Postcolonial?”, Critical Inquiry 17, no. 2 (1991): 336-57. Aamir R. Mufti, “Orientalism and the Institution of Indian Literature”, Forget English! Orientalisms and World Literatures, Harvard University Press, 2016. [More books and essays will be suggested as we cover the primary texts.]
ENG659
Immersion in Shakespeare
4.00
Undergraduate
Immersion in Shakespeare
ENG101
Exploring Literature
3.00
Undergraduate
Exploring Literature
ENG102
Fundamentals Of Translation
3.00
Undergraduate
Fundamentals Of Translation
ENG103
History of English Literature:
3.00
Undergraduate
History of English Literature: Victorian Era COURSE DESCRIPTION : Indian students of English Literature need to know cultural, social and political history of England to fully comprehend the finer nuances of English Literature. This course will include study of the main aspects of English social and political history, which form the background reflected in the literary works. It will trace the development of themes and genres within their historical contexts; and analyze literary works for their aesthetic features and thematic patterns. ASSESSMENT SCHEME: Class Assignment-20 marks; Speaking Assignment-10 marks; Quiz 1- 5 marks; Quiz 2- 5 marks; Final Exam 1( Objective questions)-20 marks; Final Exam 2 (Descriptive questions)- 40 marks.
ENG104
Academic Writing
4.00
Undergraduate
Course outline:  What is critical reading, thinking and writing? This course aims to inculcate ideas and skills of how to write a coherent, lucid and at the same time, a competently argued piece of text. Our set notions, beliefs and assumptions will be challenged throughout this course through close and analytical reading of several texts. This course will investigate ways to deal with complicated texts from varied disciplines and seek out methods of unravelling the mysteries of those texts through rigorous writing and verbal discussions. The key idea of this course is to provide a springboard for students to tackle textual readings in their further studies. This is a writing intensive class. Three modules which will be taught are- Personal essay, position paper and research essay.  You will write three final papers over the course of the semester-Each final paper will reflect the module. Expect a workshop like atmosphere in the class, where you will be required to revise or discuss a draft every single week. Peer reviews, group discussions and class participation are the cornerstones of this course.    The readings will include among others, essays by: George Orwell "Shooting an Elephant"; Anita Jasraj "Circus"; James Baldwin "Notes of a native son"; Bodhisattwa Kar "Imagining post- indian Histories" ; Yogendra Yadav and Suhas Palshikar "Ten theses on State Politics in India.
ENG107
Development of Language
3.00
Undergraduate
Development of Language
ENG108
Language, Lit. & Communication
3.00
Undergraduate
Language, Literature and Communication
ENG109
Intro. To Creative Writing
3.00
Undergraduate
: Introduction to Creative Writing uses a mixture of classroom lecture, in-class writing, workshopping and production of work to familiarize the students with the basics of poetry and prose writing. In the first half of the semester, we will focus on exercises geared towards writing with the senses, which is essential to the production of poetry. Students will also be familiarized with the basics of using the meter and free verse. In the second half of the semester, we will concentrate on prose. We will discuss issues such as using autobiography to create fiction, choosing the right point of view from which to tell the story, creating a memorable character and coming up with a beguiling plot. Students will also learn to utilise workshopping techniques in this course, which will enable them to become better critics of their own and other people’s work. The accent will be on writing as a reader and reading as a writer Primary texts: Maya Angelou, ‘I know why the caged bird sings,’ (Poem), William Butler Yeats, ‘The Lake Isle of Innisfree’ (Poem), Ezra Pound ‘In the station at the metro’ (poem), Esther Morgan, ‘Avocados’ (poem), Tim O’Brien, ‘The Man I Killed’ (short story), Junot Diaz, ‘How to date a brown girl (black girl, white girl, or halfie) (short story), Salman Rushdie, ‘Good advice is rarer than rubies’ (short story), Raymond Carver, ‘Popular Mechanics (short story). Secondary Text: Sol Stein, Stein on Writing
ENG110
Literary Method
3.00
Undergraduate
This course aims to inculcate among students a deep and passionate understanding of the genre of poetry by introducing them to some important contemporary poets of the 20th and the 21st centuries. Largely concerned with the vibrant themes of love and politics, these selections range widely from South Asia, Latin America, Palestine and Great Britain, and are originally written in languages as diverse as English, Spanish and Hindi-Urdu. Through this course, and with the aid of specific readings about the relationship between poetry and politics, we will appreciate the formal choices, the rhetorical worlds and the thematic preoccupations of these contemporary poets.
ENG112
Narrative Techs in 19th Centry
3.00
Undergraduate
Victorian novelist told their stories in a new style, employing methods which changed the way narrative techniques were used by 18th century novelists. Victorian novelists have used almost similar technique but each one among them brought individual innovations that make techniques look similar but at the same time unique and different. Victorian novelists’ desire to unearth new boundaries paved way for the 20th century novelist’ experimentation. This course will explore various narrative techniques employed by Victorian novelists.
ENG114
Poetry: Chaucer to Milton
3.00
Undergraduate
Selections from Shakespeare's Sonnets John Donne: 'The Sun Rising', 'Valediction Forbidding Mourning', 'The Flea', Holy Sonnets 7, 10 Andrew Marvell: 'To His Coy Mistress', 'The Definition of Love' John Milton: Paradise Lost selections from Books 1 and 4, 'When I Consider How My Light is Spent' References: Helen Gardner, ed. The Metaphysical Poets Christopher Hill, The World Turned Upside Down Stanley Fish, Surprised by Sin Internet: The Milton Reading Room: https://www.dartmouth.edu/~milton/reading_room Shakespeare's Sonnets: http://www.shakespeares-sonnets.com
ENG141
The Language Game of Literature
4.00
Undergraduate
This course seeks to address some basic questions that pertain to the domain of the literary. Some of these are: what kinds of texts qualify as literature? Do literary texts possess some special, objectively demonstrable properties, or does the label merely connote some arbitrary social consensus? Moreover, do literary texts invite us to treat them differently, as compared to non-literary texts? Does the appreciation of a literary text, depending on whether it is a poem, a story, or a play, require us to pay attention to different kinds of textual phenomena? What precisely are those phenomena? The kinds of questions raised above will be addressed in this course as we immerse ourselves in a wide-ranging selection of texts drawn from the genres of poetry, fiction, and drama. The texts are chosen so that our engagement with each of them will illuminate some specific aspects of literary appreciation. Also, as we progress through this course, we will build a critical vocabulary that will enable us to express, with increasing perspicuity, our assessments of the literary merits of literary texts. (3:0:0). Prerequisites: none. Primary Texts  A selection of poems ranging across history and geography. The poems for study will be made available to the student either electronically or through handouts. Drama: Henrik Ibsen, A Doll’s House (1879) Fiction: A selection of short stories including: “The Fall of the House of Usher,” Edgar Allen Poe (1839). “The Yellow Wallpaper,” Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1892).  “The Approach to Al-Mu’tasim,”  Jorge Luis Borges (1935). Trans. Anthony Kerrigan.  “The Cathedral,” Raymond Carver (1983).
ENG142
Fantasy and Science Fiction
4.00
Undergraduate
During the course we will discuss the nature of fantasy and science fiction literature as a form of fiction writing, how it is different from other forms of writing, and what it can do that other forms writing cannot. The course will be divided in 4 units, the first unit will be of a theoretical nature, and the last three will discuss select examples of fantasy and science fiction. Some movies will be screened and discussed.  (3:0:0). Prerequisites: none. Primary Texts Robert Scholes and Kellog, Nature of Narrative Northrop Frye, Anatomy of Criticism Rosemary Jackson, The Literature of Subversion  Variable Selections from J R R Tolkien, Lord of the Rings Ursula K Le Guin, The Dispossessed Variable Selections from Stanislaw Lem, Solaris Barry Longyear, ‘Enemy Mine’ Variable Selections from William Gibson, Necromancer Bruce Sterling, Holy Fire
ENG143
Drama: Tropes and Adaptations
4.00
Undergraduate
In this course students will read drama as a literary text and get a sense for how drama evolves from performance to text and then specifically as text geared to performance. We begin with Medea by Euripides, move on to Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus and finish with Shakespeare’s Hamlet along with Vishal Bharadwaj’s film adaptation Haider. This course will think through the types and tropes of classical drama to drama as text for literary analysis and move on to the idea of dramatic adaption in screenplay. (3:0:0). Prerequisites: none. Primary Texts  Euripides, Medea Dover Thrift Edition. (Trans. Rex Warner) Christopher Marlowe, Doctor Faustus (Norton Critical Edition) William Shakespeare Hamlet (Arden Edition) 
ENG199
Academic Writing Hybrid
3.00
Undergraduate
Academic Writing Hybrid
ENG201
Intro. to Creative writing
4.00
Undergraduate
Introduction to Creative writing
ENG202
Classics and their Times
3.00
Undergraduate
Classics and their Times
ENG204
History of Criticism
3.00
Undergraduate
History of Criticism
ENG206
Rise of Novel
3.00
Undergraduate
Rise of Novel
ENG207
Survey of American Literature
3.00
Undergraduate
Survey of American Literature
ENG209
Literature and Culture
3.00
Undergraduate
Literature and Culture
ENG210
Immersion in Shakespeare
3.00
Undergraduate
In this course we will read a selection of sonnets and 4 plays by Shakespeare. For your final project for this class you will pick one of Shakespeare’s plays that we haven’t read in class. The goal of this class will be an immersion in Shakespeare as we explore questions of gender, nature, poetics of time, literary genre and rhetoric. We will begin by reading a selection of the sonnets. The plays for this semester are: Othello, Twelfth Night and The Tempest . Expect to read some critical essays on the plays in the course. The evaluation for this course will be based on a set of quizzes, two short papers and one final paper on a play of your choice.
ENG211
Creative Wrtng. Level II Prose
3.00
Undergraduate
Course description English 315 uses a mixture of classroom seminar, in-class writing, workshops and production of work to take creative writing students to the advanced levels of writing imaginative prose. Students taking English 315 should already be familiar with the nuts and bolts of prose writing after taking the introductory course. Hence, they should be ready to embark on the production of the longer and more layered short story as well as the first few chapters of a novel. In the first 5-6 weeks of the course, we will focus on some exemplary long short stories and the first few chapters of a novel. Through a mixture of lecture and discussion, students will focus on the intricacies of plot, characterisation, point of view, voice and other important Students will also learn to utilise workshopping techniques, which will enable them to become better critics of their own and other people’s work. Learning objectives and outcomes The emphasis will be on writing as a reader, and reading as a writer. It is impossible to be a good writer without being a good reader of your own and other people’s work. We will look at a number of stories by accomplished writers and identify various techniques that students can utilise in their own work. By the end of the course, students should be well-versed in the nuts and bolts of prose fiction, and have learnt story-telling techniques that they can use to create fiction as well as narrative nonfiction. Overall, these should help strengthen their critical thinking skills, as well as allow them to think outside the box. Along with that, there should also be a general improvement in writing skills.
ENG213
Dvlpmnt. & Acquisition of Lng.
3.00
Undergraduate
Development and Acquisition of Language
ENG214
Women's Writing in Translation
3.00
Undergraduate
COURSE CONTENT: This course is primarily designed for students to enjoy a wide selection of women's literature. The broad framework of the course lies in posing the following questions (a) What can the literary teach us about issues that concern us as activists, scholars, students and teachers and policy makers? (b) What is distinctive about feminine ecriture - how does a women writer write and fictionalize her vision of the world in its actuality and possibility? Learning objectives and outcomes The course will examine the pleasures and problems of women's literature through two thematics. In the first part of the course we will read and analyze a selection of poems and short fiction that explores the notion advanced by Judith Butler that femininity is not a biological essence but a masquerade. In the second part of the course we will discuss readings where women writers explore issues of gender violence, foeticide and/or female infanticide and/or women's right to property.
ENG215
20th Century S.A. Eng. Poetry
3.00
Undergraduate
The Fingers Remember – Aditi Rao (Yoda Press) Ms Militancy - Meena Kandasamy (Navayana) The Country Without a Post Office – Agha Shahid Ali (Penguin Books) The Rebel's Silhouette: Selected Poems - Faiz Ahmed Faiz, Tr. Agha Shahid Ali (University of Massachusetts Press) In Another Country - Rafiq Kathwari (Doire Press) This Number Does Not Exist – Mangalesh Dabral, Tr. Various (Poetrywala)
ENG216
Modernist Fiction
3.00
Undergraduate
This course will introduce the student to the genre of modernist fiction through the study of a few illustrative novels and short stories. The authors to be studied include: James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Franz Kafka, and William Faulkner. These texts will enable us to think about how modernist literary styles reflected the cultural, political, and philosophical ethos of the age. Grading will be based on class participation, presentations, a 2500-word paper, and a final (open-book) exam.
ENG235
Study Culture, Caste & Gender
3.00
Undergraduate
Studying Culture, Caste and Gender
ENG240
Getting Verse
4.00
Undergraduate
This course will introduce students to the idea of poetic form, think about what constitutes a poetic movement, and finally focus on an individual poet as training in ways to read poetry by understanding craft and cultivating an ear for resonance to understanding what individual talent has to do with tradition. We will begin the semester with a sample of genres and modes and learn about what the distinguishing and overlapping characteristics of different poetic forms and modes are, for instance in the following: sonnet, villanelle, ghazal, blank verse, ode and aubade. Moving from reading poems in isolation we will think about the idea of poetic tradition, where a group of poets can be read together as a part of a movement such as Bhakti Poetry. In the final part of the course we will focus on the work of a single poet to understand how we read poets in their time a get a sense for a body of a single poet’s work. This semester we will study Arun Kolatkar. (3:0:0). Prerequisites: none. Primary Texts A selection of poems by Shakespeare, Donne, Dylan Thomas, Sylvia Plath, Mir, Adrienne Rich, Agha Shahid Ali, Elizabeth Bishop, John Keats, Philip Larkin, T. S Eliot Arundhati Subramaniam Ed. Eating God: Bhakti Poetry, Penguin 2014 Arun Kolatkar Jejuri, New York Review Book, 1974
ENG241
Shakespeare and His Contemporaries
4.00
Undergraduate
The commercial playhouses and playing companies of Elizabethan and Jacobean London were a unique socio-cultural phenomenon which produced some of the richest literary texts within the entire corpus of English literature as well as literatures in English. The myth of Shakespeare’s ‘timeless genius’, his universal adaptability across spatio-temporal boundaries has become a critical commonplace. This course seeks to locate Shakespeare in his times, to examine his works as a product of his times. To this end we will read two Shakespearean plays, in conjunction with two plays by contemporary dramatists, to understand better the scope and breadth of English Renaissance drama including and beyond Shakespeare. The course will focus on the specific material circumstances of dramatic production and performance, but also attempt a sustained engagement with the language and formal aspects of the popular theatre, and situate the readings within broader currents of intellectual, political, and religious thought. More specifically, we will engage with disparate ideas ranging from kingship to conjugality, from gender to genre, from self-reflexive theatricality to early modern notions of self-hood. The texts will include one tragedy and one comedy by Shakespeare, and one each by another contemporary dramatist—in this case Middleton (comedy) and Webster (tragedy). This course will aim to inculcate familiarity with the language of Renaissance drama through close readings. It will also equip the students with an understanding of the social, political, religious, and economic conditions which shaped, inhibited, and engendered the rise of the commercial theatre and of the conditions and modes of performance of the plays. (3:0:0). Prerequisites: none. Primary Texts Merchant of Venice (1605) Macbeth (1606) Thomas Middleton Chaste Maid in Cheapside (1613) Webster Duchess of Malfi (1614)
ENG242
Linguistic Approaches to Literature
4.00
Undergraduate
Course Summary:  This course will cover basic concepts in Linguistics: Phonetics, Morphology, Semantics, Syntax. It includes theory plus practice sessions – to introduce students to the methodology of modern linguistics and teach analytic reasoning via examination of linguistic data. The course would be divided into four modules. The course also introduces students to philological analysis of literary texts.  Course Aims: To expose students to the analysis of literary texts, using linguistic analytical tools, and the purpose underlying such an analysis.  Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the course, students will be able to: •    read texts critically and proficiently to demonstrate in writing or speech the comprehension, analysis, and interpretation of those texts; •    to analyse of literary texts, using linguistic and discourse analytical tools. Curriculum Content Basic concepts in Linguistics:  Phonetics, Morphology, Semantics, Syntax, includes theory plus practice sessions – to introduce students to the methodology of modern linguistics. Old English and Middle English Philology, its importance, philological subfields. Studying Beowulf (chapter 1) on its language and context.  Manuscript available through the Electronic Beowulf project. The module will focus on one tale from the Canterbury Tales (The Knight's Tale), rudiments of Middle English as a spoken and written language, to become familiar with Middle English. a word-for-word transliteration from Old/ Middle English into Modern English; grammatical information for some of the terms in that line of text.   Beyond the sentence: Pragmatics; Translation exercises for Beowulf as well as for Chaucer. Weekly Schedule: Weeks    Topics    Explorations Module 1         Classes begin from July 31, 2018 Week 1- week- 6    Introduction, Glimpses of History of languages, English language; Linguistics & its Branches    Video; Transcription of Beowulf; Word order of the old English poem; Closed system & open class. In-Class-Activity #1      Structure of Words Morphology; Runic Characters; Old English-Historically seen; Examples from Beowulf;     Words change their meaning too; First 8 lines of Beowulf; Turkish Morphemes;  Chapter 5 ‘English Spelling is Kattastroffik’, from - Peter Trudgill and Laurie Bauer (Ed) Language Myths. Penguin Books. 1999. (On BB). Discussion & Written In-Class-Activity #2.  In Class Activity #3 Medieval English; English witnessed changes; Canterbury Tales-Knight’s Tale; Chaucer and his style; Choice of words; In-Class-Activity #4 Module 2         Week 7- 11     Beyond the Words - Phonetics -Introduction – Phonemic changes; Old English; Transcriptions from Old English;  Pronunciation and implications in Beowulf; Middle English;    Week 7: In-Class exam; Week 8-11: In-Class Activity #5 Topic Submission for - Short Term Paper: on Blackboard     Phonetics – pronunciation and implications in Knight’s Tale; The Great Vowel Shift; Grimm's Law and Verner's Law    Short Term Paper: submission on Blackboard Module 3         Week 12 - 16    Beyond the Pronunciation; Semantics – Introduction; Borrowing; Pragmatics; Translation and transliteration from Old English to Modern English    Translation – Beowulf 1st 11 lines – In-Class-Activity #6      Syntax – Introduction – Old English; Middle English;  Mechanisms of syntactic change;      Graded Activities: Translation – Knight’s Tale specified lines by the facilitator;  Submission - One 800-1000 words Short Term Paper - on Blackboard Teaching and Learning Strategy Teaching and Learning Strategy    Class Hours    Out-of-Class Hours Lectures    45 hours    90 hours Tutorials    15 hours     ASSSESSMENT Assessment Strategy     Formative assessment and feedback to student, Summary assessment at the end of the course. Weightage to be given for active class participation. 85% Attendance is mandatory. Formative Assessment: a)    Student led Discussions  b)    Response Papers c)    Short Term-Paper d)    Assignment e)    Final Long Term-Paper f)    Class Participation g)    Open Book Exam Mapping of Learning Outcomes to Assessment Strategy  Assessment Scheme Type of Assessment    Description    Percentage Module 1 & 2         Class Attendance, Discussion and Written Essays    Marks for attendance + Student led Discussions in class for all the essays  To asses and demontrate the ability to assess and deploy  critical thinking      10% Individual Student in-class Practice sessions      To analyze and demonstrate critical thinking    20% One short Paper    To analyse and write a viewpoint that is unique about a given central idea, topic or theme by taking into account varied sources, & to establish and  assert a claim,     10% Midterm Exam: Open Book Exam    Critical interpretation and assessment of the topics    10% Module 3 & 4                                                                                          Class attendance and class participation    Marks for attendance + Student led Discussions in class for all the essays  To asses and demontrate the ability to assess and deploy  critical thinking      10% Two Short papers    Critical Analysis    20% Final Long Paper    Critical Analysis     20% Bibliography and References Beowulf (chapter 1) Manuscript available through the Electronic Beowulf project https://www.gutenberg.org/files/16328/16328-h/16328-h.htm Canterbury Tales (The Knight's Tale), Simon, Sherry; Gender in Translation — Cultural Identity and the Politics of Transmission. 1996. New York: Routledge. Refer from source: https://sites.fas.harvard.edu/~chaucer/teachslf/kt-par0.htm Sheldon Pollock’s essay ‘Liberation Philology.’ David Crystal. The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language. 1987. CAU Edward Sapir. Language - An Introduction to the Study of Speech. 1921 Ferdinand de Saussure’s Course in General Linguistics; 1916 Toelkien JRR. Ed. Toelkien C.  Beowulf. Harper Collins 2014 Horobin S. Chaucer’s Language. Macmillan. 2007 Peter Trudgill and Laurie Bauer (Ed) Language Myths. Chapter 5. Penguin Books. 1999 Ziolkowski Jan. What is Philology Comparative Literature Studies, Vol. 27, No. 1, 1990. pp. 1-12. Penn State University Press
ENG243
Introduction to Translation Studies
4.00
Undergraduate
Course Summary This is a basic course, which will introduce students to key theories, models and approaches in Translation Studies relevant to contemporary research and practice in the field. The students would be studying statements from linguists, theologians, and writers to examine and recognize the value of the diversity with which translation has been appreciated and practiced throughout the ages. They will be able to analyse the traditional understanding of the link between the original and translated text, between author and translator, the source and target languages and cultures. Course Aims To enable students to interact critically and productively with examples of translation from various languages and to introduce students to some of the theoretical aspects of translation studies. Learning Outcomes Translation is one of the biggest new sectors opening up in literary studies. This course together with the companion course taught at the master’s level aims to take advantage of India’s multilinguism to raise the quality of translation to levels that may not be possible in monolingual countries. On successful completion of the course, students will be able to: Interact critically and productively with translated texts, would be able to see some of the theoretical implications of translation without producing hasty judgements, comprehend and examine the basic skills in translating  Curriculum Content Lectures, discussions, and practical work, Translation Project, Student Practice Lecture, short term paper, Group work WEEKLY SCHEDULE:       Modules    Weeks    Topics    Explorations Module 1 Week 1- week- 8    Introduction, Definition, History of Translation and Translation Studies  From Classical Period and Middle Ages. Cicero, St. Jerome,  Roman Jakobson, Jean-Paul Vinay and Jean Darbelnet, Peter Newmark, Werner Koller, Eugene Nida, Andre Lefevre, Itamar Even-Zohar, Lawrence Venuti, Susan Bassenet, Hans Vermeer    Videos; Hands on practice; In-Class-Activities – all are graded.  In-Class Discussion and short write-up (400-500 words): Letters of St. Jerome; Letter 57 -- To Pammachius on the Best Method of Translating;  In-Class-Activities x4 – all are graded.  Linguistic approach; Machine Translation; Translation: process and product, Techniques, strategies, and procedures in translation    In-Class-Activities [graded] - Rapid fire questions to be translated  - activity          Module 2 Week 9- 11    Module 2 Student led Discussions followed by Response Papers A Survey of Different Approaches in Translation Studies:  Functional  Systems    Individual Student Practice Lecture (not a presentation) on a specified topic  Week 8-11:  In-Class Discussion and short write-up (400-500 words): The Task Of The Translator by Walter Benjamin. In-Class Discussion and short write-up (400-500 words): The Position of Translated Literature within the Literary Poly-system by Even Zohar  In-Class Discussion and short write-up (400-500 words): The Priority of Purpose (Skopos theory) by Vermeer In-Class Discussion and short write-up (400-500 words):  The Hermeneutic Motion by George Steiner In-Class Discussion and short write-up (400-500 words): English Translation of Marcel Proust “Swann’s Way’ Submission of Topics for Student Practice Lecture  Module 3    Week 12 - 14     Module 3 The video assignment presentation by each group - to be shown and presented in the class for peer assessment.  Translation Studies and Other Disciplines  Cultural turn; cultural studies; gender studies– feminist translation theory  Simon, Sherry  Postcolonial translation theory  Translation Project: (40%) – Translation Project should be worked in two sections: 1.    Section A: Translated text into TL – English 2.    Section B: Critical commentary on the translated text by the student. [Guidelines would be on Blackboard]      The videos uploaded by students to be shown in the class for peer assessment. In-Class Discussion and short write-up (400-500 words): English Translation of ‘Siddhartha’ by Herman Hesse.   In-Class Discussion and short write-up (400-500 words): Guido’s Relations by Ezra Pound In-Class Discussion and short write-up (400-500 words): The Politics of Translation by Spivak Gayatri Chakravorty; Translation Project: (40%)  A.    Submission of Topic for: One 1500 words Long Term Paper  B.    Draft #1 –  C.    Draft #2 –  D.    Final submission on Blackboard  - All are graded.  Teaching and Learning Strategy (Teaching methods and tools, use of LMS, software used or taught, external visits, workshops) Teaching and Learning Strategy    Description of Work    Class Hours    Out-of-Class Hours Lectures and discussion    Lectures    45    45 Practical work        15     ASSSESSMENT Assessment Strategy     Formative assessment and feedback to student, Summary assessment at the end of the course. Weightage to be given for active class participation. 85% Attendance is mandatory. Formative Assessment: a)    Student led Discussions  b)    Response Paper c)    Individual Student Lecture Session d)    Assignment e)    Final Long Term-Paper f)    Class Participation 2.    Mapping of Learning Outcomes to Assessment Strategy  Assessment Scheme Type of Assessment    Description    Percentage Class Attendance, Discussion and Written Essays.    Marks for attendance + Student led Discussions in class for all the essays  To asses and demontrate the ability to assess and deploy  critical thinking      25%  Group Presentation on video presentation made on Translation Errors    To demonstrate the viewpoint about a given idea, topic or theme    15% Individual Student Lecture Sessions      To analyze and demonstrate critical thinking    20% Final Research Translation Project [First Draft Second Draft Final submission]    To analyse and write critical interpretation and assessment    40% Reference Books, Essays and Articles Munday Jeremy; 2008; Introducing Translation Studies: Theories and Applications; Taylor & Francis;  Susan Bassnett, 2002, Translation Studies, 3rd edition The Routledge Encyclopaedia of Translation Studies (eds. Baker and Saldanha, 2nd edition, 2009 John Biguenet and Rainer Schulte, eds., The Craft of Translation The Letters of St. Jerome; Letter 57 -- To Pammachius on the Best Method Of Translating; English Translation  Vermeer Hans J, The Priority of Purpose (Skopos theory)   George Steiner: The Translation Studies Reader.  Even-Zohar Itamar, 1990, The Position of Translated Literature within the Literary Poly-system.  Simon, Sherry; Gender in Translation - Cultural Identity and the Politics of Transmission. 1996.New York: Routledge.    Tejaswini Niranjana; Siting Translation: History, Post-Structuralism and the Colonial Context Spivak Gayatri Chakravorty; The Politics of Translation.   Benjamin Walter,The Task Of The Translator,    Pound Ezra, Guid Primary Texts Munday Jeremy; 2008; Introducing Translation Studies: Theories and Applications; Taylor & Francis; ISBN: 0415396948, 9780415396943 Susan Bassnett, ed. Translating Literature John Biguenet and Rainer Schulte, eds., The Craft of Translation The Letters of St. Jerome; Letter 57 -- To Pammachius On The Best Method Of Translating; English Translation: Fremantle,  pp. 112-119 Vermeer Hans J.;1996; “Skopos and Commission in Translational Action George Steiner: The Translation Studies Reader. 2000. (Ed) Lawrence Venuti. Routledge Itamar Even-Zohar: "The Position of Translated Literature within the Literary Polysystem." Poetics Today 11:1 (1990), pp. 45-51. Simon, Sherry; Gender in Trans-lation — Cultural Identity and the Politics of Transmission. 1996. New York: Routledge Tejaswini Niranjana; Siting Translation: History, Post-Structuralism and the Colonial Context Spivak Gayatri Chakravorty; ‘The Politics of Translation’. In The Translation Studies Reader. 2000. (Ed) Lawrence Venuti. Routledge
ENG244
Modernist Literature
4.00
Undergraduate
Course Summary Modernism is an aesthetic paradigm that prevailed in a number of artistic domains in the early part of the twentieth century. This course familiarizes the student with literary modernism. We will study exemplary works in the major genres of literature: fiction, drama, and poetry. Through this study the student will gain a sound understanding of the particulars of the modernist aesthetic as well as of the cultural, political, and philosophical ethos that informed it. Course Aims 1.    To introduce the student to some major texts of modernist literature. 2.    To familiarize the student with the themes that dominated modernist literature. 3.    To sensitize the student to the elements of form and to the modernist aesthetic. Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the course, students will be able to: a)    Be conversant with the events, themes, politics, and philosophies that informed the creation of modernist texts. b)    Identify the stylistic features that distinguish modernist texts from the texts that preceded them. c)    Perform a critical analysis of a modernist text using the frameworks learnt in this course. Curriculum Content Syllabus Fiction James Joyce, “The Dead” (1914). Virginia Woolf, Mrs Dalloway (1925). Drama: Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman (1949). Poetry: A selection of poems by poets such as William Butler Yeats, Wilfred Owen, H.D., William Carlos Williams, Marianne Moore, Wallace Stevens, Rainer Maria Rilke, and T S Eliot. Weekly Schedule: Week 1    -    Introduction. Discussion on Modernity vs Modernism. Week 2    -    Pre-discussion Quiz on Irish history  -    Discussion of James Joyce’s ‘The Dead’ Week 3    -    Discussion of James Joyce’s ‘The Dead’ Week 4    -    Discussion of James Joyce’s ‘The Dead’ -    Test1 on ‘The Dead’ Week 5    -    Pre-discussion Quiz on the novel Mrs Dalloway -    Discussion on Mrs Dalloway  Week 6    -    Discussion on Mrs Dalloway Week 7    -    Discussion on Mrs Dalloway Week 8    -    Discussion on Mrs Dalloway Week 9    -    Midsem exam on Mrs Dalloway Week 10    -    Discussion on Death of a Salesman Week 11    -    Discussion on Modernist Poems Week 12    -    Discussion on Modernist Poems Week 13    -    Discussion on Modernist Poems -    [Assignment submission (Test2) on Death of a Salesman] Week 14    -    Discussion on Modernist Poems Teaching and Learning Strategy a)    Lectures: The prose fiction and the play will require prior study by the students, followed by discussion in class. The poems will be introduced in class and discussed spontaneously.  b)    Tutorials will be used for addressing questions and for looking at extra material. c)    Blackboard: BB will be used to share e-books and other class material, and to enable online discussions. Teaching and Learning Strategy    Class Hours    Out-of-Class Hours Lectures    45 hours    90 hours Tutorials    15 hours     ASSSESSMENT. Assessment Strategy     a)    Pre-discussion Quizes to ensure knowledge of the text b)    Tests c)    Mid-term exam d)    Assignemnt e)    Final Exam Mapping of Learning Outcomes to Assessment Strategy  Assessment Scheme Type of Assessment    Description    Weightage Quiz1    Pre-discussion quiz on “The Dead”    5% Test1    Questions on “The Dead”    10% Quiz2    Pre-discussion quiz on Mrs Dalloway    10% Midterm Exam    Questions on Mrs Dalloway    30% Assignment    Assignment on Death of a Salesman    15% Final Exam    Questions on modernist poetry    30% Total    100% Bibliography PRIMARY TEXTS: James Joyce, “The Dead” (1914). Virginia Woolf, Mrs Dalloway (1925). Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman (1949). SECONDARY: (Suggested Readings) Malcolm Bradbury and James McFarlane. Modernism: A Guide to European Literature 1890-1930 Peter Childs. Modernism.  Christopher Butler. Modernism: A Very Short Introduction Raymond Williams: Politics of Modernism
ENG245
South Asian Literature
4.00
Undergraduate
This course is designed to introduce students to some of the most important and vibrant texts in contemporary South Asian literature. It straddles the genres of novel, poetry and short-stories written in different regions of South Asia, including Sri Lanka, India, Pakistan and the disputed Kashmir valley. This course seeks, thus, to familiarize the students with the literary output in South Asia and its diasporas, that comes to grips with vital questions of form, political conflict, caste, language, religion and gender. (3:0:0). Prerequisites: none Primary Texts Arundhati Roy, The God of Small Things (1997) Michael Ondaatje, Anil’s Ghost (2000)    Premchand, The Chess-Players (tr. by Hans Raj Rahbar) Ismat Chughtai, The Quilt (tr. by M. Asaduddin) Saadat Hasan Manto, Toba Tek Singh (tr. by Khalid Hasan) Faiz Ahmad Faiz, Last Night, Don’t ask me for that love again, A Prison Evening, Bangladesh III in The Rebel’s Silhouette: Selected Poems by Faiz Ahmad Faiz, translated by Agha Shahid Ali (1991) Agha Shahid Ali, Tonight, Homage to Faiz Ahmad Faiz, The Country Without a Post Office, I See Kashmir From New Delhi At Midnight in The Veiled Suite: The Collected Poems (2009)
ENG295
Spcl. Topics in Trans. & Ling.
3.00
Undergraduate
Special Topics in Translation and Linguistics
ENG296
Special. Topics In Lit.
3.00
Undergraduate
Special Topics In Literature: Medieval to Romantic
ENG297
Case Study -: Dorothy Parker
3.00
Undergraduate
Case Study - Single Author: Dorothy Parker
ENG301
British Lit.: Romantic Poetry
3.00
Undergraduate
This course attempts to study British Romantic poetry from Blake to Keats. We will contextualise British Romanticism as a literary, aesthetic and cultural phenomenon arising within a particular historical milieu, and study how the poetry of this period evolves, the recurring concerns shared by the six poets: the role of nature, its relationship with art, the concept of revolution, individual autonomy, education, and the conflict between empirical rationality and intuitive imagination. We will begin by locating Romantic poetry within a literary tradition, examining the continuities and ruptures between Romanticism and its Enlightenment predecessors. Our exploration of the poetry of this period, the poetic and metrical forms employed, and the use of figures of speech, will be juxtaposed with a reading of certain key philosophical and political tracts, to get a better sense of the intellectual backdrop against which these poems were composed and read.
ENG304
Introduction to Gender Studies
3.00
Undergraduate
Overview This course will attempt to explore, challenge and rethink gender as a conceptual category, a cultural practice and a key concern in literary and other artistic representation. By reading together a cross section of texts from different disciplines requiring a broad range of approaches, we will attempt to complicate what it is have a particular gender as an already given and seemingly natural ‘fact’ of identities in social contexts, and how this so called fact of being gendered can be both questioned and radically interpreted, altered and even undone through various interventions into the codes that make up and sustain gender. In the first few weeks of our course, we will examine what this process of formation consists of, how genders and their attributes are produced within cultural fields, including language, and how gender as a production intersects with the domain of bodies, anatomies, sexual desire and pleasure. By seeking to work closely with issues of definition and position, we will also try to tease out the links between gender and sexuality, gender and the body, gender and questions of form in representation. Our focus will remain on gender as a category closely associated with the historical field of modernity, on the way in which it is thought, rethought, codified, deployed and made into a discourse connected with the systematization of knowledge, both in post Enlightenment Europe and in colonial and postcolonial India. A crucial component of our study spread over 4 weeks will a close engagement with the significant role played by women’s writing in Anglo-American and Indian contexts in highlighting the need to examine the complex and heterogeneous terrain of gender and sexuality in different personal and social articulations, including and especially those that have historically been on the margins. In the last few weeks, we will explore the sites at which the myth of gender as a stable and monolithic category is exposed as something that is constantly affirmed as such through acts of violence and rupture. We will explore the contours of this violence by engaging with the field of masculinities as being simultaneously the site for the idealization of gender norms in various expressions of ‘manliness’ often in the service of larger socio cultural projects, as well as for radical forms of deviations from such norms through instances of parody and pathos. We will then move on to areas that pose serious challenges to the myth of sexual dimorphism and compulsory heterosexuality by looking at the field of alternative sexualities. We will look at instances where the body itself as a primary material vehicle of gendered expression is implicated in systems of violence and the ways in which modes of resistance can be configured from this very position of embodiment. Finally we will think about what the implications of our various trajectories through gender in the previous weeks are when the question of the medium of representation is brought to the forefront, and thus when habits and modes of reading and perceiving gendered objects and bodies are refocused. We will look at gender as it unfolds in works of art, dance, cinema and theatre, in relation to questions of images, spectatorship, costuming, and the physical life of the dynamic and explicit body as an instrument of art. We will hope to take the field of gender studies beyond the disciplinary borders of literary studies to not only explore perspectives from different disciplinary engagements with gender, but also to ask ourselves questions about how disciplinary matrices and methodologies might themselves contribute to processes of gendering.
ENG315
Adv. Creative Wrtng. Level III
4.00
Undergraduate
Advanced Creative Writing Level III - Prose
ENG316
Folklore
3.00
Undergraduate
Folklore
ENG319
18th Century Prose
4.00
Undergraduate
18th Century Prose: Essayists, Pamphleteers and Diarists
ENG320
Victorian Novels
3.00
Undergraduate
Victorian Novels: Narrative Techniques
ENG325
Global Folklore
3.00
Undergraduate
This course provides an introduction to contemporary folklore from around the world. How do people from all walks of life create meaning and beauty in their everyday lives? How do communities and groups maintain a collective sense of themselves that distinguishes them from other communities/groups, particularly in a period of rapid globalization? What does it mean to respect and conserve cultural as well as biological diversity? Students will begin by learning key concepts of folklore scholarship: culture, tradition, performance, genre, the local/global distinction, the folk/popular divide, the dynamics of the customary and innovative in folklore production. Through an exploration of these concepts students will develop an expansive definition of folklore as the means by which groups both distinguish themselves from as well as fashion bridges with diverse communities. Additionally, we will explore a set of special topics in folklore through readings and films from different world regions. We will focus on the transmission and transformation of cultural knowledge and practice in situations of want and plenty, peace and conflict. Please note: This course will involve videoconferencing. We will have at least two sessions with students in OSU, allowing the class to enact global communication strategies as we study global cultures.
ENG326
Post-Modernist Fiction
3.00
Undergraduate
This course will study a selection of drama written and performed in England in the 17th century. Our focus in the first part of the course will be a cluster of plays that were produced at the beginning of the century in the wake of James I’s reign. These plays performed as part of a range of court theatricals were a complex site for the negotiation of emergent shifts in political, philosophical and religious beliefs: an increasing dissatisfaction among the nobility and landowners with royal arrogance, the rising power of the mercantile class and their desire to contribute to processes of governance, James’ suppression of Catholic liturgy and his episcopal policy of uniting the church and the state in the figure of the monarch culminating in the commissioning of a comprehensive translation of The Bible in 1611, a growing interest in the physical dimension of the human body— its contribution to fashioning a cosmetic self deployed through surface manipulations, and its relationship with the larger body politic of the nation state. Such negotiation took on a generic form in the recurrent concerns of these plays with violence, decadent behaviour, dissembling, sexual perversions and a pervasive cynicism about the value of human relationships, becoming in turn covert commentaries on the corruptions of the Jacobean court. The plays of the Jacobean age characterised by “murderous plans, fortuitous escapes, bloody dispatches, clumsy attempts at concealment and final judicial retribution” (Sanders: 1994) were thus both products and critiques of the age that engendered them. These thematic features can be traced to a context in which knowledge, including knowledge of the private self, became an expansive and examined category. Francis Bacon’s Novum Organum foregrounded scientific truth and a mode of inductive reasoning as a category of inquiry independent of theological premises. The plays themselves attempted to give aesthetic expression to the idea of “theatrum mundi”: an ironic attitude that saw human life as analogous to the ephemeral and spectacular life of the theatrical act. The majority of Jacobean playwrights responded to this context of cultural change and accommodated it to the form of the drama itself, both in the deployment of plot, character and dialogue as well as in the use of specific theatrical machinery: props, tableaux and mise-en-scènes that have both narrative and symbolic functions. In the second half of the course we shall examine another set of plays produced after the reopening of public theatres and the restoration of the monarchical office in 1660. These plays produced for a recreated domain of public, commercial performance responded to ongoing revisions in canons of aesthetic value and taste. Restoration comedy or the comedy of manners was an often ironic, tongue-in-cheek exploration of the foibles and excesses of the aristocratic elite and their zealous production of a set of social and moral codes based in fashionable deportment, witty repartee, sexual licentiousness and sophisticated urbanity. We will explore how a new semiotics of the self, including the gendered self, was created in these plays, where individual identity became a set of unstable and shifting locutions of language and comportment, constantly challenging the self’s fixed location in available institutional structures like marriage, morality and sexual fidelity. We will examine the plays in the context of the conditions surrounding performance in the wake of Charles II’s reign. One significant historical factor that will be taken into account is the introduction of actresses on the English stage and how this impacted the representation of gender roles in the plays. In locating 17th century drama within a history of performance forms and practices, we will investigate the close nexus between political ideologies of the time, including the spectacle of monarchical power, and the theatre as a material, aesthetic, pedagogical and philosophical site for continuing and contesting these ideologies through the stage’s particular deployment of spectacle, time, scenography and rhetoric.
ENG327
Drama
3.00
Undergraduate
Drama
ENG340
The Fundamentals of Crea. wrtg
4.00
Undergraduate
The Fundamentals of Creative Writing uses a mixture of classroom lecture, in-class writing, workshopping and production of work to familiarise the students with the basics of poetry and prose writing. In the first half of the semester, we will focus on exercises geared towards writing with the senses, which is essential to the production of poetry. Students will also be familiarised with the basics of using the meter and free verse. In the second half of the semester, we will concentrate on prose. We will discuss issues such as using autobiography to create fiction, choosing the right point of view from which to tell the story, creating a memorable character and coming up with a beguiling plot. Students will also learn to utilise workshopping techniques, which will enable them to become better critics of their own and other people’s work.
ENG341
Mapping Language Change
4.00
Undergraduate
Language change is constant. Linguistic boundaries are never clear-cut. At best, linguistic boundaries can be described as overlapping transitional spaces where migration and urbanization shape new possibilities of human interaction. Language spoken at present is the best laboratory for a linguist.  This course is both theoretical and empirical inquiry into language change.  Focus of the chosen texts is on language universals and linguistic typology. Second part of this course will be field study- data collection and analysis. Students will learn data analysis through triangulation- statistical analysis of quantitative data in specialized linguistic labs; and critical discourse analysis of qualitative data. (1:0:3). Prerequisites: none Primary Texts Language Universals and Linguistic Typology, Bernard Comrie, 1981. Weinreich,U., Labov, W., Herzog, M., 1968. Empirical Foundations for a Theory of Language Change, in Directions for Historical Linguistics, ed. W.P.Lehmann, Y. Malkiel, 97-195, Austin: Univ. Texas Press.
ENG342
Introduction to Critical Theory
4.00
Undergraduate
This course aims to introduce students to the basic theoretical works that revolutionized literary studies during the 1970s and 80s.The focus of the texts chosen is insistently on the literary. They comprise some of the most definitive works we have on (a) the basic aspects of the literary (language, discourse, author, reader), (b) literary genres (the novel, poetry) and the locations of literary criticism (Feminism, Post-colonialism). Focusing on language, discourse, genres and social orientation, this course will equip students with sophisticated conceptual frames to deal with not just literary material but any situation in life which involves human communication. (3:1:0). Prerequisites: none Primary Texts Ferdinand de Saussure, (1915) A Course in General Linguistics W. ed. M. Baskin (London: Fontana) p111-121 M.M. Bakhtin, from. The Dialogical Imagination (1934) Holquist extract in Rice and Waugh, Modern Literary Theory pp230-39 Roland Barthes, “Death of the Author” From Image-Music-Text (1968) trans. S.Heath, pp142-48 Michel Foucault, “The Order of the Discourse” (1971) in Robert Young, Untying the Text (1971) 52-64 Wolfgang Iser, “The Reading Process” (1974) extract in Philip Rice and Patricia Waugh, Modern Literary Theory: A Reader (London: Arnold) Elaine Showalter, “Towards a Feminist Poetics” in Mary Jacobus ed. Women Writing About Women (1979) pp. 25-36 Homi Bhabha, “Of Mimicry and Man: The Ambivalence of the Colonial Discourse” October No. 28, Spring (1983) 125-33. Jerome J. McGann, “The Text, the Poem and the Problem of the Historical Method” (1985) from The Beauty of Inflections   pp. 251-268  
ENG343
Landmarks in the Novel Form
4.00
Undergraduate
This course is designed to introduce students to some of the most characteristic forms that the novel has taken through the course of its long and continuing evolution and to the range of expressive possibilities that the novel, as a whole, has acquired. The novels that will be studied in this course are  (i) Don Quijote , not only  because it exemplifies the picaresque form , but also because it is a novel about novel writing itself (ii) Wuthering Heights  because it both represents and radically subverts one of the novel’s great sub genres : domestic fiction and (iii) One Hundred Years of Solitude which brings the novel up to our times and unfurls the whole range of expressive resources that it acquired through the long course of its development This course seeks, thus, to take the student through the great landmarks of the novel form, explain to her how these novels achieve their characteristic effects and enable her to analyze and work with many real life situations that involve prose narratives. (3:1:0). Prerequisites: none Primary Texts Miguel De Cervantes, Don Quijote  Book 1 (1605)  trans.  Burton Raffel Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights (1847) Gabriel  Garcia Marquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967) trans. Gregory Rabassa.
ENG344
Poetry and Conflict
4.00
Undergraduate
This course is designed to introduce students to a wide range of contemporary poetry written around conflict, whether armed combat, protracted war, occupation or forced exile. It includes poetic texts that approach some of the most intractable conflicts of the modern world with formal dexterity, empathy and resilience. This course seeks to take the students through the enormous formal, emotional and political resources wielded by such poetry in order to speak meaningfully about the conflicts that affect our contemporary world. (3:1:0). Prerequisites: none. Primary Texts Vietnam Bruce Weigl, Song of Napalm, Elegy for Peter, The Last Lie Wislawa Szymborska (tr.. Stanislaw Baranczak & Clare Cavanagh) Vietnam Ocean Vuong, Aubade with Burning City, On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous First World War Wilfred Owen, Dulce Et Decorum Est, Smile Smile Smile, Anthem for Doomed Youth Siegfried Sassoon, Glory of Women, Repression of War Experience Philip Larkin, MCMXIV Palestine Mahmoud Darwish, A Soldier Dreams of White Lilies, Identity Card (tr. Salman Masalha and Vivian Eden) Rafeef Ziadah, We Teach Life Sir, Shades of Anger Kashmir Agha Shahid Ali, The Country Without a Post-Office, I See Kashmir from New Delhi at Midnight Roushan Ilahi/MC Kash, My People, I Protest
ENG345
Politics and Polemics in Early Modern Europe
4.00
Undergraduate
This is a special topic course which will examine in detail the intersection of the political and the literary in early modern Europe. Reading political treatises from the archipelago and the mainland in juxtaposition with each other, this course will try and investigate the way in which humanist political thought develops across Europe. At the same time we will immerse ourselves in the study of the stylistic aspects various genres of vernacular prose writing popular in the Renaissance: the polemical pamphlet, the dialogue, the treatise, the advice-book for princes etc. The course will be divided in following four modules, each comprising short excerpts from a two or three key texts. Through a close reading of the material this course seeks to follow the shifting contours of political discourse, the simultaneous emergence of the rhetoric of absolutism and the language of civic rights, while relating these transformations to the major historical landmarks of the period—such as the Reformation, the Huguenot massacre, Mary Stuart’s deposition, the English civil war etc. Some of thematic and formal aspects we will focus on include: political theology, the importance of translation in the humanist project, the material circumstances of circulation of texts and ideas, political counsel, morality and ethics in the political realm, the influence of Platonic and Aristotelian political models, violence and sovereign power.  (3:1:0). Prerequisites: none. Primary Texts The Sovereign and his Counsellors Erasmus Education of a Christian Prince (1516) [Dedication, Chapter I] Machiavelli The Prince (1513) [Chapters XV-XIX, XXIII-XXV] Castiglione The Courtier (1528) [Book IV, chapters 3-10] Sovereignty and Governance Smith De Republica Anglorum (1562-3) [Book I, Chapters 1, 2, 7, 8, Book II, Chapter 1-3] Bodin Six Books of the Commonwealth (1576) [Book I, Chapters VIII, X, Book VI, Chapter 4] Tyranny and Resistance Ponet A Short Treatise on Political Power (1556) [Chapters I and VI] Buchanan De Iure Regni Apud Scotos (1571) [Chapters 7-12, 24, 27, 29, 34] Polemics of the English civil war: Justifying Tyrannicide Milton The Tenure of Kings and Magistrates (1641) Excerpts from Digger (Gerrard Winstanley) and Ranter tracts (1640’s)  [Winstanley, New Year’s Gift, Norton Anthology of Eng Lit Vol B pp. 1849-55; Nigel Smith,  A Collection of Ranter Writings: Spiritual Liberty and Sexual Freedom in the English Revolution] Compulsory reading: Quentin Skinner, The Foundations of Modern Political Thought, 2 vols., Cambridge: 1978.
ENG396
Independent Study
3.00
Undergraduate
Independent Study
ENG397
Literary Theory
4.00
Undergraduate
Literary Theory
ENG401
Literature Today: The Novel
3.00
Undergraduate
This course aims to work with three of the greatest novels of the twentieth century drawn from three different continents to study: (a) the formal possibilities of the contemporary novel (b) the cosmopolitan reach of the novel and (c) the range of themes with which the contemporary novel has engaged. The course will be based on class room lectures. Reading the novels thoroughly at least once is a minimum precondition for successfully completing this course. In addition students will be expected to read supplementary material from time to time. The three novels studied are: Gabriel Garcia Marquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude. Jose Saramago, Baltazar and Blimunda Najib Mahfouz, Palace Walk
ENG408
Philology In Literary Method
3.00
Undergraduate
Philology As The Newbie/Oldie In Literary Method
ENG411
Special Topics In Renaissance
3.00
Undergraduate
Special Topics In Renaissance Literature: Magic And Science
ENG412
Pol. Prose Writings In India
3.00
Undergraduate
Political Prose Writings In India Post-1947
ENG413
Global Swift
3.00
Undergraduate
Global Swift
ENG414
Translation Criticism &Project
3.00
Undergraduate
Translation Criticism & Translation Project
ENG422
Writing Narratives
3.00
Undergraduate
: This course is concerned with establishing a dialogue between the writing and analysis of narrative which will enable students to become better critics of their own work as well as the work of others. We will look at the fictional as well as the nonfictional narrative. While the primary texts will form the bulwark of the course, from time to time, other material will be circulated among the students by way of class handouts. The class itself will be a combination of seminar, workshopping and in-class writing. In addition, students will have to turn in homework as well as assignments for grading. Unit 1: Life writing and translating experience into fiction Vladimir Nabokov, Speak, Memory (Life writing), Tim O’Brien, ‘The Man I Killed’ (short story) 4 weeks Unit 2: Fiction Short stories Jhumpa Lahiri, ‘Hell-Heaven’ Anton Chekhov, ‘The Lady with the Dog’ Raymond Carver, ‘What We Talk About When We Talk About Love’ Novel Michael Ondaatje, The English Patient 7 weeks Unit 3: Reportage John Carlin, Playing the Enemy: Nelson Mandela and the Game 3 weeks Secondary reading: 7 Sol Stein, Stein on Writing, St Martin’s Griffin, 2000. Evaluation A piece of life-writing (2000-2500 words) to be turned in at mid-term Short story or piece of reportage (2000-2500 words) to be turned in as part of the final portfolio. With the short story or piece of reportage the student will also submit a critical commentary that will analyse the process of creating the narrative and explain the creative decisions made in the process of composition. This will be turned in as part of the final portfolio There will be an end-of-semester examination
ENG424
South Asian Writing
3.00
Undergraduate
South Asian Writing
ENG425
Post-Colonial Theory
3.00
Undergraduate
Is POCO dead? Would it be more accurate to say that postcolonial theory in 2016 is a revenant? And where can we locate Fanon, Said, Spivak and Guha in this death and/or return of the dead? The conference note in 2005 at Princeton speculated on the death of poco in the following way: Is this the promised end of (postcolonial) theory? Has the disappearance of “theory” in the North American academy allowed the institutionalization of postcolonial studies that cannot “resist mere appropriation by the dominant” as Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak puts it. Is there an opening here for an emergence of a new postcolonial theory? Or was the theory in postcolonial theory always too close to the metropolitan cultural studies Spivak speaks of that is “monolingual, presentist, narcissistic, not practiced enough in close reading.” Simon Gikandi summarizes one critique of postcolonial theory by stating that the primary failure of postcolonial theory has been to privilege the act of reading over politics. In this course we will be looking at the major debates within the field of Postcolonial Theory. The second objective of the course is introduce students to the debates around the death of postcolonial theory. Lastly, the final objective of the course is to invite students to think through the next era of postcolonial literary criticism. What are the futures of postcolonial theory? Will it haunt us as revenant? Or decay like a corpse? Alternately will the futures of postcolonial theory lie in a revitalized decolonizing of the mind and imagination? Unit 1: Fanon, Ananthamoorthy, Bhabha, Leela Gandhi 4 weeks Unit 2: Said-Foucault and/or Said-Mufti 4 weeks Unit 3: Spivak/Derrida 3 weeks Unit 3: Unit 4: Guha and excerpt from Fabian 2 weeks
ENG426
The Visual and the Literary
3.00
Undergraduate
This course, which focuses on material drawn from Europe between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries, aims to equip students with the ability to move between literary and visual forms and to track ways in which expressive strategies mutate in this process. The course will focus on formal categories such as realism and the differing ways in which chronotopes are deployed by literary and visual forms , but it will also take students through a set of paintings and novels to demonstrate how these forms can be brought into an interanimating relationship. Unit 1: Time and Space Gotthold Ephraim Lessing, Laocoon : An Essay on the Limits of Painting and Poetry translated by Edward Allen McCormick, Chapters 16-18 Mikhail Bakhtin “Forms of time and of the Chronotope in the Novel” ( excerpt) from The Dialogical Imagination translated by Caryl Emerson and Michael Holquist. 3 weeks Unit 2: Realism E.H .Gombrich, Art and Illusion ( excerpts ) Norman Bryson Vision and Painting ( excerpts) Roland Barthes , S/Z Trans. Richard Miller. Jaques Ranciere, The Future of the Image. trans. Gregory Elliott. Chapter 3, “Painting in the Text” 6 weeks Unit 3: Painting and the Novel Titian , “Venus of Urbino” Vermeer “The Lace maker” Peter de Hooch , “Woman Reading a Letter” Jane Austen, Mansfield Park Hogarth, “Industry and Idleness” all 12 plates Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist 5 weeks
ENG430
20th Century Fantasy Fiction
3.00
Undergraduate
During the course we will discuss the nature of fantasy literature as a form writing, how it is different from other forms writing, and what is literary about it. We will also attempt to understand the tremendous rise in its popularity from the late 19th century onwards, and analyze it as a social phenomenon in the west. The course will be divided in 4 units, the first unit will be of a theoretical nature, and the last three will discuss select examples of fantasy literature.
ENG440
Contemporary Forms of Fiction
4.00
Undergraduate
In this course we shall, having studying various kinds of fiction writing, look at other forms of fiction making, including RPG, ‘psuedo’ videos on YouTube®, made-up trailers for movies etc, graphic novels and movies and TV shows. The intention is to attempt to understand the difference between reading a more or less structured piece of literature, and forms that at this point in time seem more free-flowing and less deterministic. The following issues will be addressed primarily: Virtuality, Simulation, Actuality, Reality, Virtual Reality, Digital Gaming and its Implications for Gaming, More Recent Digital Innovations, and the question ‘Why does a Game Need a Story?’(3:1:0). Prerequisites: none. Primary Texts Selections from David Bell and Barbara Kennedy, The Cybercultures Reader Richard Stallman, Lecture at Calcutta, 16.08.2006 (text will be provided) Selections from Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison (section on the ‘panopticon’, and the section on ‘Docile Bodies’ Gilles Deleuze, ‘Society of Control’ Graphic Novel  Joe Sacco, Palestine, (with an introduction by Edward Said) TV Show/ Movie Westworld
ENG441
Feminist Theory: Unlocking the Literary
4.00
Undergraduate
This course is primarily designed to introduce students to feminist theory. The course will also examine the pleasures and problems of women's literature. The broad framework of the course lies in posing the following questions: What are the ways in which feminist theory unlocks literary texts? What is distinctive about feminine ecriture - how does a women writer write and fictionalize her vision of the world in its actuality and possibility?  (3:1:0). Prerequisites: none Primary Texts Ruth Vanita, Gender, Sex, and the City: Urdu Rekhti Poetry in India, 1780-1870 (2012). Helene Cixous, The Laugh of the Medusa (1975). Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own. A History of Feminist Literary Criticism, Cambridge U Press, 2007, 66-100 (Chapters 4 and 5).  Mary Eagleton, Feminist Literary Theory: A Reader. Blackwell Publishers Ltd. 98-102, 238-265.
ENG442
Translation Theory and Practice
4.00
Undergraduate
This course will offer some advanced discussion of translation as a cultural form, history of translation studies, and lastly, theoretical approaches to translation. This course provides a study of translation criticism which is the systematic study, evaluation, and interpretation of different aspects of translated works. It is an interdisciplinary academic field closely related to A. Literary Criticism B. Translation Theory. & C. Translation Project. Students will be expected to complete each reading and 1. Prepare a short critical analytical essay (approx. 500 words) and 2. Questions on each assigned reading. Students would bring a typed copy of the prepared short analytical essay and questions to class. Add-on and edit your essay on this printed page after the discussion is over. (3:1:0). Prerequisites: none Primary Texts Montaigne's Essays Montaigne's Essays: Book I (1533-1592) - Translation by J. Florio (1553-1625) Hugo Friedrich; ‘On the Art of Translation’. In Rainer Schulte, John Biguenet (eds), Theories of Translation. Walter Benjamin, ‘The Task of the Translator’, from Walter Benjamin: Selected Writings. Two translations of this essay will be studied. George Steiner ‘The Hermeneutic Motion’. In The Translation Studies Reader. 2000. (Ed) Lawrence Venuti. Routledge Antoine Berman, "La traduction comme epreuve de l'etranger," [Translation and the trials of the foreign] Texte 4 (1985) Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak ‘The Politics of Translation’. In The Translation Studies Reader. 2000. (Ed) Lawrence Venuti. Routledge Jacques Derrida, "From Des Tours de Babel." In Rainer Schulte, John Biguenet (eds), Theories of Translation. The Bible: King James’ Version, Book of Genesis (several translations of this book will be discussed. Translation Project English translation of a text (of the student’s choice) along with details involved in process of translation or a scholarly research project on a topic related to translation, supervised by the faculty member.
ENG443
Crafting Poems
4.00
Undergraduate
This course is meant to introduce undergraduate students to the art of writing poetry. Every student will be preparing a portfolio of poems throughout the semester on which s/he will be examined. There will be a supportive workshop context within the class hours. Classroom exercises will include reading and listening to important contemporary poets, focusing on three specific areas of Form, Theme and Politics. We will explore formal, aesthetic, emotional and political choices in writing poetry through both group and individual writing exercises that are experimental and stimulating. The course would include interacting with a visiting poet, whose work the students would read in detail, and who will be responding to the students' works. Through extensive workshopping of the students' poems, this course hopes to create enthusiastic practitioners of the genre. (3:1:0). Prerequisites: none Primary Texts Week 1: Introduction Readings: I’m Explaining a Few Things by Pablo Neruda, To a Young Poet by Mahmoud Darwish, Indian Summer by Dorothy Parker, Open Letter to Honey Singh by Rene Sharanya Verma, Week 2: Reading, Writing Exercise: On Theme: Love, Workshop Readings: Dubious by Vikram Seth, Don’t ask me for that love again by Faiz Ahmed Faiz, A ‘Thank You’ Note by Wislawa Szymborska, Tonight I can write the saddest lines by Pablo Neruda Week 3: Reading, Writing Exercise: On Form: Ghazal, Workshop Readings: Ghazal on Ghazals by John Hollander, Tonight by Agha Shahid Ali, Bring the Flowers to Bloom by Faiz Ahmed Faiz, Hip-Hop Ghazal by Patricia Smith           Week 4: Reading, Writing Exercise: On Politics, Workshop Readings: Dulce Et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen, Dear Mr. Yadav, I too am an Indian Woman by Aditi Rao, Harlem by Langston Hughes, I See Kashmir from New Delhi at Midnight by Agha Shahid Ali Week 5: Reading, Writing Exercise: On Theme: Loss, Workshop Readings: Musee des Beaux Arts by W.H. Auden, Atlantis by Mark Doty, Aubade by Philip Larkin, Resume by Dorothy Parker Week 6: Reading, Writing Exercise: On Form: Villanelle, Workshop Readings: One Art by Elizabeth Bishop, Do not go Gentle into that Good Night by Dylan Thomas, If I could tell you by W.H. Auden, Mad Girl’s Love Song by Sylvia Plath     Week 7: Reading, Writing Exercise: On Politics, Workshop Readings: Still I Rise by Maya Angelou, The White Man Killed My Father by David Diop, Merged Landscapes by Rudramoorthy Cheran, We Teach Life, Sir by Rafeef Ziadah, Week 8: Reading, Writing Exercise: Individuated, Workshop Readings: [TBA] Week 9: Final Revisions, Individual Workshops with Instructor, Submission of Mid-Term Portfolios Week 10: Reading Works by Writer in Focus Readings: [TBA] Week 11: Responses to Works by Writer in Focus, Workshop Week 12: Responses to Works by Writer in Focus, Workshop Week 13: Visit by Writer in Focus, Responses to Students’ Works Week 14: Individual Workshops with Instructor Week 15: Final Revisions, Submission of Portfolios
ENG444
Crafting Short Fiction
4.00
Undergraduate
This course will look at the short story from 1000 to 3000 words.  Students will study exemplary texts in class.  They will discuss the nuts and bolts of writing fiction such as point of view, creation of character, and plot.  They do that in the Fundamentals of Creative Writing course as well.  However, here they will do it in far greater detail. Furthermore, they will study setting, writing dialogue, editing and revising, and also use workshopping techniques extensively.  In addition to the creative writing, they will write a critical commentary which will make them aware of the fact that the creative and critical go together.  For grading purposes they will produce two stories each, plus a critical commentary to go with the second story.  It would help if students taking this course have taken Intro to Creative Writing at the 100 -level.   In the first half of the course, we will focus on the shorter 1500-word story.  After the mid-term, we will focus on the 2,500-word story.  Through a mixture of lecture and discussion, students will focus on the intricacies of plot, characterisation, point of view, voice and other important attributes of writing fiction. Students will also learn to utilise workshopping techniques, which will enable them to become better critics of their own and other people’s work. (3:1:0). Prerequisites: none. Primary Texts Ernest Hemingway, ‘Hills like White Elephants’ Raymond Carver, ‘A Small, Good Thing’’ Jhumpa Lahiri, ‘When Mr Pirzada Came to Dine’’ James Joyce, ‘Araby’ Anton Chekhov, ‘The Grasshopper’ Etgar Keret, ‘Lieland’ Junot Diaz, Miss Lora Daniyal Mueenuddin, ‘Nawabdin Electrician’ Sol Stein, Stein On Writing, ISBN-13  978-0312254216
ENG445
World Folk Literature
4.00
Undergraduate
This course is a survey of folk literature identifying archetypes, themes, and motifs, orally transmitted literature across place and time. Students will begin by learning key concepts of folklore scholarship: culture, tradition, performance, genre, the local/global distinction, the folk/popular divide, and the dynamics of the customary and innovative in folklore production.  Through an exploration of these concepts students will develop an expansive definition of folklore the way that stories live between and among people i.e. tellers and audiences, collectors and translators; adapting themselves to changing times, circumstances and metaphysical spaces. The course will focus on the transmission and transformation of cultural knowledge and practice in situations of want and plenty, peace and conflict. (3:1:0). Prerequisites: none Primary Texts Barre Toelken, The Snails Clues in The Anguish of Snails: Native American Folklore of the West, pp. ix-xii and 1-8 Zipes, Jack. 2003. “Once There Were Two Brothers Named Grimm.” Introduction to the Complete Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm, 3rd ed. New York: Bantam. xxiii-xxxvi. Propp V. (1968) Discussion of Tale-Types and Motifs, Morphology of the Folktale. University of Texas Press, Chapter 2-4 Kirin Narayan, 1993; Refractions of the Field at Home: American Representations of Hindu Holy Men in the 19th and 20th Centuries, Cultural Anthropology 8(4):476-509 Regina Bendix, 1989 Tourism and Cultural Displays: Inventing Traditions for Whom? The Journal of American Folklore 102 (404): 131-146. Sadhana Naithani (2006) In Quest of Indian Folktales, Orient Blackswan; Chapter 3 Kelly Feltault, 2006; Development Folklife: Human Security and Cultural Conservation, Journal of American Folklore 119 (471):90-110 Films: Ever After (1998) by Andy Tennant – with Drew Barrymore in a new version of “Cinderella” (with Leonardo da Vinci as her fairy godmother) Sugar Cane Alley (1983) Director Euzhan Palcy
ENG446
Vernacular Literary Practices
4.00
Undergraduate
This course will highlight the historical emergence and development of vernaculars in European and world literature. Students will be introduced to major theoretical formulations about vernaculars by poets and novelists. Drawing on these readings students will analyze a short fiction and a novel in which the vernacular is the central concern. The goal of the course is to introduce students to the idea that there is a profound fissure at the heart of literature between hegemonic concepts of the literary versus minority or non- elite; controversies and debates that circulate around the notion of the vernacular constitute one way to get at this fissure and analyze it. (3:1:0). Prerequisites: none Primary Texts Module One: Histories of the Emergence of Vernacular Language–Literatures ( Four Weeks) Benedict Anderson, ‘Old Languages, New Models’ Imagined Communities, Verso Revised Edition 2007, 69-84. Sheldon Pollock, ’The Cosmopolitan Vernacular ’ The Journal of Asian Studies, vol. 57: No. I ( Feb 1998) 6-37. Korean television drama, Tree with Deep Roots (the TV serial dramatizes King Sejong who lived in 1397-1450 and his promotion of the Korean vernacular and invention of Hangul alphabet at a time of elite dominance of Mandarin Chinese). Module Two: Debates around the concept of vernaculars (Four Weeks) Aligheri Dante, De Vulgare Eloquentia (1302). Ngugi Wa Thiongo, ’The Language of African Fiction” Decolonizing the Mind: The Politics of Language in African Literature (1986), 63-86. UG Krishnamoorthy, English Brahmins, Kannada Shudras Module Three and Four: Two Case Studies of Vernacular Literary Studies (Seven Weeks) Phaniswarnath Renu’s The Third Vow (Aanchalik Sahitya) Perumal Murugan, One Part Woman (Vattara Ilakkiam) ->
ENG501
UG Supervised Research Paper
9.00
Undergraduate
The undergraduate supervised research paper enables the student to explore a specific topic of interest under the close supervision of a faculty member and ultimately produce a research paper at the end of the study. The process document for this course is attached as an appendix below.
EDU199
Issues in Higher Education
3.00
Undergraduate
Issues in Higher Education
ENG660
Phot. Obj. from Curat to Cultu
4.00
Graduate
Photographic Objects from Curation to Cultural Analytics
ENG663
Imperial Possession in Victor
4.00
Graduate
Imperial Possession in Victorian Literature
ENG634
Renaissance Literature
4.00
Graduate
Renaissance Literature
ENG635
Advanced Writing and Research Methods
4.00
Graduate
This course will introduce post-graduate students to the art of research and formal research paper writing. Expect to be taken through the nitty-gritties of research training in genres of formal writing: research proposal, research paper, conference abstract, conference presentation, MLA citation, methods of researching library catalogues (card and digital), indexes and databases and how to access and gain membership in the major research libraries in Delhi. Unit 1: Reading to Write Brooks, Cleanth., Gregory Colomb, Joseph Willams Eds. The Craft of Research. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1995. Foucault, Michele. “The Statement and the Archive” from The Archaeology of Knowledge & the Discourse on Language. New York: Pantheon Books, 1972 Gallaghar, Catherine and Stephen Greenblatt. “Introduction” Practicing New Historicism. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1997 Geertz, Clifford. “Thick Description: Toward an Interpretative Theory of Culture” in The Interpretations of Culture. New York: Basic Books Inc., 1973 MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, Seventh Edition. 3 weeks Unit 2: Pick an area for a research paper Make a Bibliography Annotate the Bibliography Research Proposal Write a literature Review 3 weeks Unit 3: 5-page Paper 5-page paper due (1700 words) Draft 1 Draft 2 3 weeks Unit 4: 10-15 page Paper 10-15 page paper due (3500-4000 words) Rough Draft 1 Rough Draft 2 Final Draft Conference abstract Conference presentation
ENG636
The Global 18th Century
4.00
Graduate
It is impossible to understand 18th Century Europe without understanding the 18th century as a global phenomenon. This course will be interdisciplinary and will track various strands through literary analysis, cultural studies and history. Decades of the long eighteenth century are remarkable for the prose output of essayists, diarists, pamphleteers, writers of conduct books, and travelogues. The rise of political parties, mushrooming of clubs and coffee houses, and the new publishing houses gave huge impetus to prose writings. This course will also track that particular moment of European history when the common public started asking uncomfortable questions about ‘imperialism’. From a geo-political perspective, this course will resonate deeply with 21st century political realities. Unit 1: Primary Texts Selections from Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels Excerpts from Mary Wortley Montagu’s Turkish Letters Secondary Texts: Clement Hawes’ introduction to the critical edition of Gulliver’s Travels Donna Landry, “Alexander Pope, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, and the literature of social comment" in The Cambridge Companion to English Literature 1650-1740. 1999 Felicity Nussbaum, Introduction to The Global Eighteenth Century 4 weeks Unit 2: Primary Text Selections from Jonathan Swift’s A Tale of Tub Secondary Text: Excerpt from Carole Fabricant’s Swift’s Landscape 3 weeks Unit 3: Primary Text Joseph Addision, The Musical Instruments of Conversation; On Giving Advice On Long Winded People; Reflections by Richard Steele Excerpts from Roger De Coverley Series Example of Conduct Literature: Lady Sarah Pennington - An Unfortunate Mother’s Advice to Her Absent Daughters Secondary Texts: Caroline Davis, "Publishing in the Eighteenth Century: Popular Print Genres" 2005 Critical Edition of Pennington’s prose piece by Mary Lynette Austin, 2009. 3 weeks Unit 4: Primary Text Excerpts from Pepys and Evelyn’s Diaries Secondary Texts: Dan Doll and Jessica Munnis, Essays on the Seventeenth –and Eighteenth-Century Diary and Journal, 2006 Srinivas Aravamudan’s chapter titled “Lady Mary in the Hammam” in Tropicpolitans, an excerpt from Enlightenment Orientalism. 4 weeks Evaluation Reading Comprehension in-class exam Long paper (min. 10 double spaced pages) Power-point presentation on long-paper
ENG637
The Novel in 19th Century Europe
4.00
Graduate
The three European nations that play a crucial role in the evolution of the novel in Europe in the nineteenth century are Britain, France and Russia. In this course we will investigate how the novel evolved in these countries with a view towards locating the points of convergence and divergence. As part of this investigation we will also study what two influential critics have to say about the novels in question as well as the 19th-century European novel in general. Unit 1 Jane Austen, Mansfield Park 4 weeks Unit 2 Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment 6 weeks Unit 3 Stendhal The Red and the Black 4 weeks Secondary Readings Georgy Lukacs ,"Balzac and Stendhal’’ in Studies in European Realism, pp. 65- 85 Mikhail Bakhtin, excerpts from "Forms of Time and of the Chronotope in the Novel" from The Dialogical Imagination pp.243-258. Evaluation 3 papers of 1500 words each on all 3 novels (one on each novel) A research paper of 2000-2500 words on one of the three authors studied during the semester An examination at the end of the semester
ENG638
Philology
4.00
Graduate
Philology
ENG639
Women,Sub. & Mod. in IND & ENG
4.00
Graduate
Women, Subjectivity and Modernity in India and Engliand
ENG640
Research Writing
4.00
Graduate
Research Writing
ENG641
The Literary and the Visual
4.00
Graduate
This course which focuses on material drawn from Europe between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries aims to equip students with the ability to move between literary and visual forms and to track ways in which expressive strategies mutate in this process. The course will focus on formal categories such as realism and the differing ways in which chronotopes are deployed by literary and visual forms , but it will also take students through a set of paintings and novels to demonstrate how these forms can be brought into an interanimating relationship. Unit 1: Time and Space Gotthold Ephraim Lessing, Laocoon : An Essay on the Limits of Painting and Poetry translated by Edward Allen McCormick, Chapters 16-18 Mikhail Bakhtin “Forms of time and of the Chronotope in the Novel” ( excerpt) from The Dialogical Imagination translated by Caryl Emerson and Michael Holquist. 3 weeks Unit 2: Realism E.H .Gombrich, Art and Illusion ( excerpts ) Norman Bryson Vision and Painting ( excerpts) Roland Barthes , S/Z Trans. Richard Miller. Jaques Ranciere, The Future of the Image. trans. Gregory Elliott. Chapter 3, “Painting in the Text” 6 weeks Unit 3: Painting and the Novel Titian , “Venus of Urbino” Vermeer “The Lace maker” Peter de Hooch , “Woman Reading a Letter” Jane Austen, Mansfield Park Hogarth, “Industry and Idleness” all 12 plates Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist 5 weeks Evaluation Evaluation in this course will be continuous and conducted throughout the semester. The object of evaluation will be to test a student’s knowledge of the material taught through the course and the development of her analytical, critical and writing abilities. A final grade will be awarded on the basis of written presentations in seminars, participation in seminars and a 2,000 words term paper to be submitted at the end of the course. The course instructor may also set a short written examination to test the student’s knowledge of the texts taught.
ENG642
Writing Narratives
4.00
Graduate
This course is concerned with establishing a dialogue between the writing and analysis of narrative which will enable students to become better critics of their own work as well as the work of others. We will look at the fictional as well as the nonfictional narrative. While the primary texts will form the bulwark of the course, from time to time, other material will be circulated among the students by way of class handouts. The class itself will be a combination of seminar, workshopping and in-class writing. In addition, students will have to turn in homework as well as assignments for grading. Unit 1: Life writing and translating experience into fiction Vladimir Nabokov, Speak, Memory (Life writing), Tim O’Brien, ‘The Man I Killed’ (short story) 4 weeks Unit 2: Fiction Short stories Jhumpa Lahiri, ‘Hell-Heaven’ Anton Chekhov, ‘The Lady with the Dog’ Raymond Carver, ‘What We Talk About When We Talk About Love’ Novel Michael Ondaatje, The English Patient 7 weeks Unit 3: Reportage John Carlin, Playing the Enemy: Nelson Mandela and the Game 3 weeks Secondary reading: Sol Stein, Stein on Writing, St Martin’s Griffin, 2000. Evaluation A piece of life-writing (2000-2500 words) to be turned in at mid-term Short story or piece of reportage (2000-2500 words) to be turned in as part of the final portfolio. With the short story or piece of reportage the student will also submit a critical commentary that will analyse the process of creating the narrative and explain the creative decisions made in the process of composition. This will be turned in as part of the final portfolio There will be an end-of-semester examination.
ENG643
Postcolonial Theory
4.00
Graduate
This course is meant to introduce students to the major debates within the field of Postcolonial Theory. The debates are outlined under three subheadings which familiarize the students with, first, the field of postcolonial literature and how it responds to the long history of the Empire, second, an exploration of how Postcolonial Theory is deeply invested in revising Eurocentric discourse and studying its consequences, and third, an investigation of how colour prejudice has been both the primary medium and the effect of the long duree of colonial domination. Unit 1: Writing Back Achebe, Chinua. “African Writer,” in Colonial Discourse and Postcolonial Theory, Patrick Williams and Laura Chrisman, Eds. New York: Columbia UP, 1994. Ashcroft, Bill, et al., “Introduction”, “Cutting the ground: critical models of post-colonial literatures”, “Theory at the crossroads: indigenous theory and post-colonial reading”, “Rethinking the post-colonial: post-colonialism in the twenty first century” in The Empire Writes Back: Theory and Practice in Post-Colonial Literatures. London, Routledge, 1989. 4 weeks Unit 2: Changing Discourse Said, Edward., “Introduction”, “The Scope of Orientalism”, “Orientalism Structures and Restructures”, in Orientalism, New York: Pantheon, 1978. James, C. L. R., “Preface to the First Edition”, “The Property”, “The Owners”, “Parliament and Property”, “The San Domingo Masses Begin”, “And the Paris Masses Complete”, in The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L'Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution, New York: The Dial Press, 1938. 5 weeks Unit 3: Colouring Perceptions hooks, bell. “Representing Whiteness in the Black Imagination,” in Grossberg, Lawrence et al., Cultural Studies. London: Routledge, 1990. Fanon, Frantz., “Introduction”, “The Black Man and Language”, “The Woman of Colour and the White Man”, “The Man of Colour and the White Woman”, “The Black Man and Psychopathology” in Black Skin, White Masks. New York: Grove Press, 1962. 5 weeks Evaluation Mid-semester - Written Assignment (Choice between 10 questions) - 1500 words Final Submission - Written Assignment (Question decided individually for candidates in consultation with the instructor) - 2500 words
ENG644
South Asian Writing
4.00
Graduate
This course is meant to familiarize the students with the major literary texts and debates from 20th/21st century South Asia. It is divided into two sections, consisting of novels and poetry respectively. Through an exploration of Hyder, Rushdie and Hanif, the students get a chance to explore the literary responses to the turbulent political history of the subcontinent from the Partition, to the Emergency to the fall and rise of dictatorships in the region. Through studying the poetry of Dhasal, Pasha and Das, we investigate the issues of caste, gender and conflict as inflecting the aesthetic of the subcontinent’s poets. The background readings help to ground these debates with critical writings on caste, on the viability of the category of ‘South Asian literature’, on the role of English in the region, and on conflict in the region. Unit I Qurratulain Hyder, River of Fire (NDPC: 1999) Salman Rushdie, Midnight’s Children (Random House: 2006) Mohammed Hanif, A Case of Exploding Mangoes (Vintage: 2009) 9 weeks Unit II Namdeo Dhasal: “Man, You Should Explode”, “Speculations on a Shirt”, “Cruelty”, “The day she was gone”, “Arsefuckers Park”, “New Delhi: 1985”, “Mandakini Patil: A Young Prostitute, My Intended Collage” Kyla Pasha, Selections from High Noon and the Body (Yoda Press, 2010), “Poem on a Paper Aeroplane Floated Across the Border”, “High Noon and the Body”, “Saddest Seattle Song”, “Up Next, Lahore Song”, “Playmate of the Year” Kamala Das, Selections, “Farewell to Bombay”, “The Dance of the Eunuchs”, “A Feminist’s Lament”, “An Introduction”, “The Looking Glass”, “Summer in Calcutta”, “Nani”, “Gracious Allah” 5 weeks Background Readings B.R.Ambedkar, Sections 1-11, The Annihilation of Caste (1936) Harish Trivedi, "South Asian Literature: Reflections in a Confluence" Indian Literature, Vol. 49, No. 5 (September-October 2005), pp. 186-194 Raja Rao, Preface to Kanthapura (1938) Perry Anderson, "Why Partition?", London Review of Books Vol 34 No. 14, 19 July 2012 Evaluation Mid-semester - Written Assignment (Choice between 10 questions) - 1500 words Final Submission - Written Assignment (Question decided individually for cadidates in consulation with the instructor) - 2500 words
ENG645
The Long Renaissance
4.00
Graduate
This course will examine in detail four quintessential moments that visibly shaped thought and knowledge in the British Renaissance. We will read a prose fantasy by a leading humanist, poetry that is mired in anxieties of love, politics and science, a play that puts self-doubt and skepticism at the heart of early modernity, and finally two books of an epic that gives aspiration, failure and the exercise of justification a grand lyric. The theme of wanting to know, sometimes more than what is obviously knowable, will underlie our reading and enquiry. Unit 1: Utopia by Sir Thomas More Stephen Greenblatt, "At the Table of the Great: More's Self-Fashioning and Self-Cancellation," in Renaissance Self-Fashioning Quentin Skinner, "Sir Thomas More's 'Utopia' and the language of Renaissance humanism" 3 weeks Unit 2: “In Defense of Poesie” by Philip Sidney Selections of sonnets by Petrarch, Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare, Marvel and Donne Dolan, Francis E. “Taking the Pencil out of God’s hand: Art, Nature and the Face Painting Debate in Early Modern England”. PMLA 108. 2 (March 1993) 224-239 3 weeks Unit 3: Hamlet by William Shakespeare Peter Stallybrass, Roger Chartier, J. Franklin Mowery, and Heather Wolfe “Hamlet’s Tables and the Technologies of Writing in Renaissance England” Selections from Kastan, David Scott, Ed. Critical Essays on Shakespeare’s Hamlet. New York: G. K. Hall, 1995. 4 weeks Unit 4: Book I & 2of Paradise Lost by John Milton Fish, Stanley. Surprised by Sin Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1967. Guillory, John. "From the Superfluous to the Supernumerary: Reading Gender into Paradise Lost." In Soliciting Interpretation: Literary Theory and Seventeenth-Century English Poetry. Eds Elizabeth D. Harvey and Katherine Eisaman Maus. Chicago and London: Chicago UP, 1990. 68-88. 4 weeks Evaluation 2 papers (2500 words each) 1 creative response to any one of the texts or themes under discussion (this can be a set of poems, a story, a pamphlet, graphic art, anything at all). Word limit can be negotiated depending on the genre) 1 final paper (3500-4000 words) and conference-style presentation at the end of the semester
ENG646
Modernism
4.00
Graduate
This course is meant to introduce the students to the major debates of the literary movement of Modernism in the early-mid 20th century. The selection of texts represents the range of experimentation with form and content that the movement exhibited. The texts emerge from as varied a set of places as Germany and Argentina, England and Russia, and Romania and Ireland, testifying to the transcontinental nature of the movement. The background readings from Bertolt Brecht, Frederic Jameson and Henri Bergson help us understand the new equations of the formal and the thematic that Modernism brought about. Unit 1 Bertolt Brecht, Mother Courage Eugene Ionesco, Rhinoceros 4 weeks Unit 2 Virginia Woolf - To the Lighthouse James Joyce - The Dead (from The Dubliners) Jorge Louis Borges – "The Approach to Al-Mu'tasim", "The Garden of Forking Paths", " The Library of Babel", "The Secret Miracle". 7 weeks Unit 3 T.S. Eliot - The Wasteland Wilfred Owen – “Dulce et decorum est”, “A Terre” Anna Akhmatova – “The Muse”, “Epigram”, “In Memoriam, July 19, 1914” W. B. Yeats – “Leda and the Swan”, “Among School Children” 3 weeks Background Readings Bertolt Brecht, ‘The Street Scene’, ‘Theatre for Pleasure or Theatre for Instruction’, and ‘Dramatic Theatre vs Epic Theatre’, in Brecht on Theatre: The Development of an Aesthetic, ed. and tr. John Willet (London: Methuen, 1992) pp. 68–76, 121–8. Henri Bergson, 1913 'The Intensity of Psychic States' in Time and Free Will: An Essay on the Immediate Data of Consciousness, George Allan & Company: London. Fredric Jameson, 'Introduction' to The Modernist Papers, Verso: 2007. Evaluation Mid-semester - Written Assignment (Choice between 10 questions) - 1500 words Final Submission - Written Assignment (Question decided individually for candidates in consulation with the instructor) - 2500 words
ENG647
Translation Studies
4.00
Graduate
Students will study the various approaches to the history, theory, and criticism of literary and humanistic translation. Topics of discussion would include study of translation criticism which is the systematic study, evaluation, and interpretation of different aspects of translated works, translator’s working methods, interviews with translators, multiple translations, the changing nature of interpretive approaches, theoretical models of translation, and criteria for the evaluation of translations It is an interdisciplinary academic field closely related to literary criticism and translation theory. Unit 1: Equivalence and equivalent effect Walter Benjamin ‘The Task of the Translator’. In L. Venuti (Ed.)., The Translation Studies Reader, 2000 Eugene Nida ‘Principles of Translation as exemplified by Bible Translating’. R. A. Brower (ed.): On Translation, New York, OUP. Swann's Way. (À la recherche du temps perdu #1) by Marcel Proust, Lydia Davis (Translator) 2004 by Penguin Classics (first published 1913) [ pp ‘Overture’] David Bellos. 2012. Is That a Fish in Your Ear? Translation and the Meaning of Everything. [Article: A Fish in Your Ear: The Short History of Simultaneous Interpreting, pp 259-273] 5 weeks Unit 2: Translation Shift Approach & Linguistic approach to translation Jakobson, Roman. “On Linguistic Aspects of Translation.” In Translation Studies Reader by L. Venuti. 2000. Routledge. Vinay, Jean-Paul and Darbelnet, Jean. ‘A Methodology for Translation’. 1995. John Benjamins Publishing. J C Catford, A Linguistic Approach to Translation. 1965. OUP Zwart, K. M. van: ‘Translation and original: Similarities and Dissimilarities, I’, Target [pp 151 – 189] 4 weeks Unit 3: Translation and Post-Structuralism Season of Migration to the North, 2003 Penguin Classics Series Derrida, J. (1985). Des Tours de Babel. J. Graham (Tr.). In J. Graham (Ed.), [Difference in Translation (pp. 165-207)]. Ithaca, London Geeta Patel . 2002. “Lyrical Movements, Historical Hauntings on Gender, Colonialism, and Desire” in Miraji’s Urdu Poetry. Stanford University Press. 3 weeks Unit 4: Translation as a cultural act K Ramanujan “Three Hundred Ramayanas” Bassnett Susan. 1998. ‘Postcolonial Translation: Theory and Practice’ Bassnett S, Lefevere A. 1998 ‘Constructing Cultures’. [The Translation Turn in Cultural Studies. pp 123-140] 2 weeks Evaluation A short paper and class presentation of 1000 words on each of the Module Final assessment: A Critical Analysis of a translated work (last week) Class Participation and peer review
ENG648
Feminist and Queer Writing
4.00
Graduate
This course is meant to introduce students to important feminist and queer literature produced between the late 19th and the early 21st century. Whereas the section “Feminist Interventions” is meant as an exploration of feminist subjectivities across regions and races, the section “Queer Interrogations” studies how queer expressions have used existing social discourses to make place for same-sex desire in their worlds. The background readings open up the theoretical debates about categories of ‘women’ and ‘LGBT’, explore intersectionality as an analytical force, and subject feminist and queer claims to questions of form. Unit 1: Feminist interventions Selections from Carol Ann Duffy: ‘Warming her pearls’, ‘How many sailors to sail a ship?’, ‘Havisham’, ‘Valentine’, ‘Mrs. Midas’, ‘Anne Hathaway’, “The Lovers”, “Mrs Lazarus” Audre Lorde: Zami: A New Spelling of My Name (Crossing Press: 1982) Ismat Chughtai, A Life in Words, translated by M. Asaduddin (Penguin: 2012) 7 weeks Unit 2: Queer interrogations Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray Pandey Bechan Sharma ‘Ugra’ , Chocolate and Other Writings on Male Homoeroticism, translated by Ruth Vanita (Duke University Press: 2009) Geetanjali Shree, The Roof Beneath Their Feet, translated by Rahul Soni (Harper Collins India: 2010) 7 weeks Background Readings Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, "Introduction: Axiomatic" to Epistemology of the Closet (University of California Press: 1990) Judith Butler, "Subjects of Sex/Gender/Desire" in Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity (Routledge: 1990) bell hooks, "Black Women: Shaping Feminist theory" in Feminist Theory: From Margin to Centre (Pluto Press: 2000) Evaluation Mid-semester - Written Assignment (Choice between 10 questions) - 1500 words Final Submission - Written Assignment (Question decided individually for candidates in consultation with the instructor) - 2500 words
ENG649
19th Century Poetry
4.00
Graduate
This course acquaints the student with some key moments in the poetry of nineteenth-century Europe and America. We begin with the English romantics, exploring the romantic engagement with nature, the self, and the tantalizing promise of political revolution. Next, we encounter some distinctively American poetic strains such as the transcendentalist and the gothic. Finally, we return to Europe, to Browning’s dramatic monologue and the French Symbolists, where we witness the early stirrings of the twentieth-century preoccupation with the craft of poetry. Unit 1: The Romantics: Nature and the Imagination Primary Texts: William Wordsworth: “The Daffodils”, “Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” S. T. Coleridge:”Kubla Khan”, “The Ancient Mariner” Secondary Texts: William Wordsworth, “Preface to Lyrical Ballads” 4 weeks The Romantics: The Age of Enlightenment Primary Texts: William Blake: London, Tyger P. B. Shelley: Ode to the West Wind Secondary Texts: Thomas Paine: “The Rights of Man” 3 weeks Unit 2: Nineteenth Century American Poetry Primary Texts: Walt Whitman: “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry” Emily Dickinson: “I heard a Fly buzz - when I died”, “Because I could not stop for Death”, “The Soul selects her own society”, and other selections from Complete Poems Secondary Texts: Henry David Thoreau, Conclusion of Walden Emily Dickinson, Letters of Emily Dickinson 4 weeks Unit 3: Precursors to Modernist Poetry Primary Texts: Robert Browning: “My Last Duchess”, “The Bishop Orders His Tomb” Charles Baudelaire: “To a Passerby”, “Le Crépuscule du soir [Evening Twilight]”, (from The Flowers of Evil translated by William Aggeler) Secondary Texts: “The Flaneur” from The Writer of Modern Life by Walter Benjamin 3 weeks Evaluation Three assignments, one on each unit (2500 words each) Class participation
ENG650
American Literature
4.00
Graduate
This course is meant to be an indicative survey of 20th century American literature. The genres include novels, memoirs and poetry, and major issues explored in this course are crisis of American self-identity in the long 20th century, race and the afterlife of slavery, colonialism and neo-colonialism, and experimentation of genre within American literature. Unit I F. Scott. Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby 4 weeks Alice Walker, The Colour Purple 4 weeks Unit 2: Nonfiction Sherman Alexie, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian 2 weeks Unit 3: Poetry Allen Ginsberg, ‘Howl’, ‘A Supermarket in California’, ‘America’ Elizabeth Bishop, ‘Arrival at Santos’, ‘Crusoe in England’, ‘One Art’, ‘Questions of Travel’ 3 weeks Unit 4: Short Stories Junot Diaz, ‘How to date a browngirl (black girl, white girl or halfie)’ Raymond Carver, ‘A small, good thing’ Ernest Hemingway, ‘A clean, well-lighted place’ 1 week Background Readings Zora Neale Hurston, ‘How It Feels To Be Coloured Me’ James Baldwin, ‘Notes of a Native Son’ Joan Didion, "Slouching Towards Bethlehem" Vine Deloria, ‘Indian Humor’ Evaluation Class Participation Mid-term assignment (1500 words) Final assignment (2500 words)
ENG651
Analyzing Culture
4.00
Graduate
This course seeks to equip students from the humanities and especially the social sciences with methods which they might fruitfully deploy when engaging with problems related to culture. The course is made up of four units . The first comprises a set of readings that engage with one of the central problems in the analysis of modern culture : the deeply ambiguous role of technology in the production of culture . The second unit will address another cultural effect of modern capitalism – its capacity to produce desire. The third and fourth sections focus on recent methodological breakthroughs that have unfolded in the key domains of women’s and post-colonial studies. Unit 1: Culture and Industrial Capitalism Theodor Adorno, ‘Culture Industry Reconsidered’ in The Culture Industry – selected essays on mass culture. Edited and with an introduction by J. M. Bernstein, London, Routledge, 1991, pp. 98-106. Walter Benjamin, “The Work of Art in the Age of its Technological Reproducibility ” in Walter Benjamin, Selected Writing 1935- 1938 , Harvard University Press, 2002,pp 101-134 3 weeks Unit 2: Desire of the insubstantial “On the fetishism of commodities” From Capital Vol. 1, Part 1, Chapter 1, Section 4. Freud ,“Fetishism” from the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud . J. Strachey tras. Hogarth Press, pp 147-57 Jean Baudrillard,The System of Objects Verso, 1966 4 weeks Unit 3: Gendering Cultural Studies Donna Haraway, “A Cyborg Manifesto: Science, Technology, and Socialist Feminism in the Late Twentieth Century” in Simians, Cyborgs and Women: The Reinvention of Nature. Routledge: New York, 1991, 149-181. Gloria Anzaldua, "How To Tame a Wild Tongue." in Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza. Aunt Lute Books: San Francisco. 1999, 75-86. bell hooks, “Gangsta culture" in We Real Cool: Black Men and Masculinity. Routledge: New York, 2004, 15-31. Supplementary Readings Linda Zerelli, "We Feel Our Freedom': Imagination and Judgment in the Thought of Hannah Arendt" Political Theory 33, No. 2 (April 2005): 158-188. Moira Weigel" Further Materials Towards A Theory of The Man Child" The New Inquiry. July 9, 2013. Wendy Brown, "Freedom and the Plastic Cage." in States of Injury: Power and Freedom in Late Modernity. Princeton University Press; New York. 1995, 3-29. 4 weeks Unit 4: Post-colonial Cultural Studies Gayatri Chakraborty Spivak, "Moving Devi" in Other Asias. Blackwell Publishing: Oxford, 2003, 178-208. Rajeswari Sunderajan, “The Ameena Case” in The Scandal Of The State: Women: Law and Citizenship in the Postcolonial State. Duke University Press; Durham, 2003, 45-71. Supplementary Readings Dipesh Chakraborty, “Of Garbage, Modernity and the Citizen's Gaze." in Habitations of Modernity: Essays in The Wake of Subaltern Studies. University of Chicago Press: Chicago, 2002, 65-79. Bill Ashcroft, “Sugar and slavery” in MSF Dias ed. Legacies of Slavery: Comparative Perspectives. Cambridge Scholars Publishing: Newcastle, UK, 2008, 108-125. 3 weeks Evaluation. Evaluation in this course will be continuous and conducted throughout the semester. The object of evaluation will be to test a student’s knowledge of the material taught through the course and the development of her analytical, critical and writing abilities. A final grade will be awarded on the basis of written presentations in seminars, participation in seminars and a 2,000 words term paper to be submitted at the end of the course. The course instructor may also set a short written examination to test the student’s knowledge of the texts taught.
ENG652
Fairy Tale, Fantasy and Myth
4.00
Graduate
Fairy Tale, Fantasy and Myth
ENG653
Conceptualizing World Lit.
4.00
Graduate
Conceptualizing World Literature
ENG654
Supervised Research Paper
4.00
Graduate
Course description not available.
ENG655
Skills:Reading/Writing English
4.00
Graduate
ENG656
Intro to Reading & Writing Eng
4.00
Graduate
Introduction to Reading and Writing in English
ENG658
Art and Technology
4.00
Graduate
The course will discuss, mainly, the relation between art and technology, where 'technology' is understood not only as the various techniques of production, fabrication and fabulation that are available at specific moments of production; but also as a condition which makes some techniques possible or impossible. While taking a few examples from painting and sculpting and literary writing, the discussion will mainly focus on how we understand the relation between art and technology, often seen as opposites of each other. After a discussion of the history of various techniques that available technology makes possible or impossible, we shall move on to more contemporary issues of 20th century art and 21st century art as well: graphic images made of ASCII code printing, to digital videography and 'live' coverage of events. The concept of 'virtuality' will be introduced. Unit 1 12 hrs A theoretical consideration of what technology means and does in contemporary society. Reading: Gilbert Simondon, 'Technical Mentality' Walter Benjamin, 'The Work of Art in the Age of Technological Reproducibility' Stanislaw Lem, excerpts from Summa Technologica. Unit 2 12 hrs A discussion of selected stories by Walter Miller Jr., and of positive and negative evaluations of 'technology', with a focus on Section One of 'A Canticle for Leibowitz' A discussion of Ursula Le Guin's 'The World for the World is Forest' Unit 3 13 hrs A return to the theoretical discussion of 'technology', along with a discussion of visual material from recommended readings. Donna Harraway, 'The Cyborg Manifesto' Martin Heidegger, 'The Questsion Concerning Technology' Compulsory Readings: Gilbert Simondon, 'Technical Mentality' Martin Heidegger, 'The Question Concerning Technology' Donna Haraway, 'The Cyborg Manifesto' Stanislaw Lem, excerpts Summa Technologica Walter Benjamin, 'The Work of Art in the Age of Technological Reprducibility' Recommended Readings Philosophy Bernard Stiegler, Technics and Time vol. 1 Fiction Selections from fiction by Walter Miller Jr. 'Big Joe and the Nth Generation' 'Conditionally Human' Section One of A Canticle for Leibowitz Ursula Le Guin, 'The Word for the World is Forest' Visual Material Documentaries BBC 'Life: Primates', the Chimpanzee Section BBC 'Life:Birds' Movies Terminator 1-3 Solaris (Tarkovsky, 1972) (animation) Ghost in the Shell 1-2 (anime) Graphic H R Giger Performance Art Stellarc Stefanie Trojan Marina Abramovic Ted Talks https://www.ted.com/talks/neil_harbisson_i_listen_to_color?language=en https://www.ted.com/talks/hugh_herr_the_new_bionics_that_let_us_run_climb_and_dance https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TqtiM1hK6lU Assessment Attendance and Class Participation: Classroom Presentation: Mid-term Assignment: Term-end Assignment:
ENG698
Independent Study And Research
4.00
Graduate
Independent Study And Research
ENG700
M.A Comprehensive Exam
12.00
Graduate
M.A Comprehensive Exam
ENG701
Thesis Proposal
3.00
Graduate
Thesis Proposal
ENG702
Thesis Draft
6.00
Graduate
Thesis Draft (8000-10000 words)
ENG703
Thesis Defence
3.00
Graduate
Thesis Defence
ENG601
Research Methodology
4.00
Graduate
Research Methodology
ENG602
Gender Studies
4.00
Graduate
Gender Studies
ENG603
Advanced Academic Writing
4.00
Graduate
Advanced Academic Writing
ENG604
Lit. Studies: Thry. & Prac. I
4.00
Graduate
Literary Studies: Theory and Practice I
ENG605
Translation Studies
4.00
Graduate
Translation Studies
ENG607
Writing Narratives
4.00
Graduate
Writing Narratives
ENG608
Drama: Medieval to Renaissance
4.00
Graduate
Drama: Medieval to Renaissance
ENG609
19th Century Poetry
4.00
Graduate
19th Century Poetry
ENG610
Prose -1: Rise of the Novels
4.00
Graduate
Prose -1: Rise of the Novels
ENG611
Literary Theory and Criticism
4.00
Graduate
Literary Theory and Criticism
ENG612
Gender Studies
4.00
Graduate
Gender Studies
ENG614
Literature and the Visual Arts
4.00
Graduate
Literature and the Visual Arts
ENG615
Poetry: Romantic to Modern
4.00
Graduate
Poetry: Romantic to Modern
ENG617
The Novel in 19th Cen. Europe
4.00
Graduate
The Novel in 19th Century Europe
ENG618
Postcolonial Theory
4.00
Graduate
Postcolonial Theory
ENG619
Poetry 2
4.00
Graduate
Poetry 2
ENG620
South Asian Writing
4.00
Graduate
South Asian Writing
ENG622
Methods in the analysis of culture
4.00
Graduate
This course seeks to equip students from the humanities and especially the social sciences with methods which they might fruitfully deploy when engaging with problems related to culture. The course is made up of four units . The first comprises a set of readings that engage with one of the central problems in the analysis of modern culture : the deeply ambiguous role of technology in the  production of culture . The second unit will address another cultural effect of modern capitalism – its capacity to produce desire. The third and fourth sections focus on recent methodological breakthroughs that have unfolded in the key domains of women’s and post-colonial studies. Unit 1: Culture and Industrial Capitalism Theodor Adorno, ‘Culture Industry Reconsidered’ in The Culture Industry – selected essays on mass culture. Edited and with an introduction by J. M. Bernstein, London, Routledge, 1991, pp. 98-106. Walter Benjamin, “The Work of Art in the Age of its Technological Reproducibility ” in Walter Benjamin, Selected Writing 1935- 1938 , Harvard University Press, 2002,pp 101-134 Unit 2: Desire of the insubstantial Marx, “On the fetishism of commodities” From Capital Vol. 1, Part 1, Chapter 1, Section 4. Freud ,“Fetishism” from the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud . J. Strachey tras. Hogarth Press, pp 147-57 Jean Baudrillard,The System of Objects Verso, 1966 Unit 3: Gendering Cultural Studies Donna Haraway, “A Cyborg Manifesto: Science, Technology, and Socialist Feminism in the Late Twentieth Century” in Simians, Cyborgs and Women: The Reinvention of Nature. Routledge: New York, 1991, 149-181. Gloria Anzaldua, "How To Tame a Wild Tongue." in Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza. Aunt Lute Books: San Francisco. 1999, 75-86. bell hooks, “Gangsta culture" in We Real Cool: Black Men and Masculinity. Routledge: New York, 2004, 15-31. Supplementary Readings Linda Zerelli, "We Feel Our Freedom': Imagination and Judgment in the Thought of Hannah Arendt" Political Theory 33, No. 2 (April 2005): 158-188. Moira Weigel" Further Materials Towards A Theory of The Man Child" The New Inquiry. July 9, 2013. Wendy Brown, "Freedom and the Plastic Cage." in States of Injury: Power and Freedom in Late Modernity. Princeton University Press; New York. 1995, 3-29. Unit 4: Post-colonial Cultural Studies Gayatri Chakraborty Spivak, "Moving Devi" in Other Asias. Blackwell Publishing: Oxford, 2003, 178-208. Rajeswari Sunderajan, “The Ameena Case” in The Scandal Of The State: Women: Law and Citizenship in the Postcolonial State. Duke University Press; Durham, 2003, 45-71. Supplementary Readings Dipesh Chakraborty, “Of Garbage, Modernity and the Citizen's Gaze." in Habitations of Modernity: Essays in The Wake of Subaltern Studies. University of Chicago Press: Chicago, 2002, 65-79. 17 Bill Ashcroft, “Sugar and slavery” in MSF Dias ed. Legacies of Slavery: Comparative Perspectives. Cambridge Scholars Publishing: Newcastle, UK, 2008, 108-125.   Evaluation. Evaluation in this course will be continuous and conducted throughout the semester. The object of evaluation will be to test a student’s knowledge of the material taught through the course and the development of her analytical, critical and writing abilities. A final grade will be awarded on the basis of written presentations in seminars, participation in seminars and a 2,000 words term paper to be submitted at the end of the course. The course instructor may also set a short written examination to test the student’s knowledge of the texts taught.
ENG623
American Literature
4.00
Graduate
American Literature
ENG624
Literary Theory
4.00
Graduate
This course will familiarize the student with some key ideas in the history of literary theory and criticism. We shall read the relevant texts closely, beginning with the ancients and arriving at the first half of the twentieth century. From Plato to Fish, we will pay special attention to the epistemological and ontological presuppositions of each theorist. Students will write short papers on important areas covered in class. There will be an open-book exam at the end of the semester. Unit 1: Text and World: The question of mimesis Plato: Book X of The Republic Aristotle: Excerpts from Poetics 2 weeks Unit 2: Text and Author: Poetic subjectivity Alexander Pope: Excerpts from An Essay on Criticism William Wordsworth: Excerpts from “Preface to Lyrical Ballads” ST Coleridge: Excerpts from Biographia Literaria TS Eliot: “Tradition and the Individual Talent” 3 weeks Unit 3: Text and Reader (A): Aesthetics Immanuel Kant: Excerpt from Critique of Judgment Edmund Burke: “The Sublime and the Beautiful Compared” 2 weeks Unit 4: The Text Itself (A): Formalism Wimsatt and Beardsley: “The Intentional Fallacy” Viktor Shklovsky: Excerpts from “Art as Technique” 2 weeks Unit 5: The Text Itself (B): Language and Semiotics Mikhail Bakhtin: “Heteroglossia in the Novel” Ferdinand de Saussure: Excerpts from Course in General Linguistics Roland Barthes: Excerpts from Mythologies 3 weeks Unit 6: Text and Reader (B): Reader Response Theory Roland Barthes: “Death of the Author” Stanley Fish: “How to Recognize a Poem When You See One.” 2 weeks Evaluation Two assignments during the semester (2500 words each) Final Exam (open book) Class participation
ENG626
Supervised Research Paper
4.00
Graduate
Supervised Research Paper
ENG627
Modernism
4.00
Graduate
Modernism
ENG628
Topics In Theory & Criticism
4.00
Graduate
Special Topics In Theory And Criticism
ENG629
Feminist and Queer Writing
4.00
Graduate
Feminist and Queer Writing
ENG630
Topics In Comp. & World Lit.
4.00
Graduate
Special Topics In Comparative And World Literature
ENG631
Global Swift
4.00
Graduate
Global Swift
ENG632
English In The Vernacular
4.00
Graduate
English In The Vernacular